Wednesday, October 31, 2012

2012 Talk of the Town Award for Outstanding Customer Service Awarded to Wise Chiropractic


October 31, 2012 /Blogspot Press Release/ -- Dr. Jon Wise scores another victory in 2012, Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center has won a second straight CMUS Talk of the Town Customer Satisfaction Award in the Chiropractic and Holistic Physician’s category. 

The Talk of the Town Awards, presented by Talk of the Town News, Customer Care News magazine and Celebration Media U.S. (CMUS), honors companies and professionals that provide excellent customer service as reported by their customers through no-cost, user-review websites, blogs, social networks, business rating services, and other honors and accolades. This data is analyzed by a team of researchers who calculate a company's CMUS Power Rating(TM). Only those that receive a 4-star to 5-star rating receive the CMUS Talk of the Town Customer Satisfaction Award. 

Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center was established in December 2006 by Jonathan Wise, DC. Dr. Wise is a graduate of the prestigious Cleveland Chiropractic College, Dr. Wise has been practicing Holistic Wellness Care since 2006. , Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center provides exceptional health care services in all areas, such as holistic medicine, chiropractic care, pediatric care, pregnancy care, NAET allergy elimination, nutritional testing, HCG weightloss, therapeutic exercises, yoga therapy, auto/car accidents and so much more.

Dr. Wise says that every effort is made to treat patients in house and avoid unnecessary referrals outside of the office. "We strive to provide outstanding patient service to ensure that each of our patient's needs is met, not only clinically but financially and personally as well," says Dr. Wise. 

Patient satisfaction is a top priority for the team at , Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center, which is illustrated by the practice's back-to-back Talk of the Town Awards for customer satisfaction. When it comes to excellent customer service, Dr. Wise says, several things are of utmost importance. "Excellent customer service means no long wait times to get an appointment as well as no long waits in the the front office," he says. "Our clients are treated as family and friends, being offered honest and holistic/medically needed care and advice. We also offer a afterhours emergency care for the individuals who need it."

Other items that Dr. Wise feels set his practice apart include professionalism, confidentiality, cleanliness of the office and friendliness. "Our office is characterized by professional, friendly, dependable, tactful, respectable and upbeat individuals," he says. "Patients are always greeted with smiles and never leave our office without a smile," he says. 

In addition to patient satisfaction, , Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center places an emphasis on patient education and cutting-edge technology. "We aim to educate our patients on the importance of spine hygiene/healthcare, and therefore provide incomparable clinical patient care while developing a concrete doctor-patient relationship so that the benefits of services are maximized," says Dr. Wise. "We pride ourselves on providing old-fashioned customer service while delivering knowledgeable and affordable medical expertise, utilizing state-of-the-art materials and equipment."

Wise Chiropractic: Holistic Family Wellness Center is located at 5875 S. Rainbow Blvd #201 in Las Vegas, NV. For more information, call 72-248-6292 or go online to www.wisechiropractor.com    . 


About Celebration Media U.S.: Celebration Media provides companies with valuable information on improving customer care through its publishing division, which produces Customer Care News, and its research department, which provides businesses with information on customer service best practices. This commitment has led to the creation of the Talk of the Town Awards program, which is dedicated to identifying companies that are excelling in high-rated customer service feedback and offering them valuable marketing opportunities to leverage their award, while also giving consumers a tool to find the top consumer-rated businesses in the United States and Canada.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Forever Young


Forever Young

forever_young_200.jpg
Chiropractic Care and the Fountain of Youth
There is no fountain of youth, of course, but there does exist a fountain of youthfulness. Anyone can gain access to this fountain by following a consistent plan of healthy nutrition, regular vigorous exercise, and sufficient rest. When you add regular chiropractic care to your long-term program, all your activities provide a greater yield.
Chiropractic care works by optimizing the functioning of your spinal column. The spinal column houses and protects spinal nerves, branches of your central nerve system that carry messages to all the other parts of your body. When the various parts of your spine - the vertebrae - are working well together, messages can flow freely back and forth along the spinal nerves. By helping ensure this free flow of information, chiropractic care helps you get the most out of your nutrition, exercise, and other healthful activities.
Most of us like to think of ourselves as young: young in heart at least, if not actually young in years. But is it possible to stay "forever young" in terms of health and wellness? Of course, probably no one would want to remain forever young in terms of life experience. Our experiences give us character and contribute to our growth and development as persons.

As we get older, though, gaining skills and possibly wisdom, is it really necessary to suffer physical breakdowns along the way? Holding on to youthful bloom may not be feasible in all aspects, but there are a few critical tips and tricks to retain much of that glow and vigor as we get older. We may not, in reality, stay forever young, but we sure can give meaning to the notions that "50 is the new 30" and "60 is the new 40". Here are two key tips. They may seem obvious, but the power is in actually implementing these tips consistently over time.

Tip #1: Eat less. Each person has his or her own caloric balancing point beyond which extra food will be retained as fat. If your average daily calorie consumption is right around this critical value, all the energy in the food you eat will be used to support your physical functioning. But extra calories will not be burned up and this unused energy will be stored as fat. Over time, increasing fat stores frequently lead to chronic disease such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. So with respect to long-term health, it's a very good idea to avoid overeating. Of course, we want to have fun, too, but that's what a "free food day" is for. If you eat within your caloric range on six days of the week, the seventh can be a "free day" when you can eat whatever you want. Such a system works very well for ongoing optimal weight management (which, of course, means ongoing health and well-being, contributing to our notion of "forever young").1

Tip #2: Exercise more. Did you ever see a gymnast, competitive swimmer, or professional dancer who didn't look absolutely terrific? These young men and women are in such good shape owing to the high volume of exercise they do every week. Do you know an older adult who was on a high school or college gymnastics team or was a professional dancer long ago? Isn't that person still really healthy and fit? Such long-term fitness results from a lifelong habit of exercise. The very good news is that even if you haven't exercised in many, many years, you can still derive benefit for years to come from starting to exercise, right now.2,3

You get fit by doing the work. Not all at once of course, but gradually, steadily, building up strength and endurance, starting right where you are. The secret is to begin. And after not too long a time, you'll find that your new habit of exercise is providing all kinds of surprising benefits, including deeper, more restful sleep and increased energy and exuberance. Not to mention weight loss and a slimmer waistline.

These two tips, eating less and exercising more, have been known for decades. But in order to reap the many benefits, what's required is to actually do these things. We can be forever young, relatively literally, by taking these simple actions on our own behalf.

1Campbell KL, et al: J Clin Oncol Reduced-Calorie Dietary Weight Loss, Exercise, and Sex Hormones in Postmenopausal Women: Randomized Controlled Trial. 2012 May 21 [Epub ahead of print] 
2Umpierre D: Physical activity advice only or structured exercise training and association with HbA1c levels in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA 305(17):1790-1799, 2011
3Betof AS, et al: Effects and potential mechanisms of exercise training on cancer progression: A translational perspective. Brain Behav Immun 2012 May 17 [Epub ahead of print]

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Could your lifestyle be making you sick?


Could your lifestyle be making you sick?

fruitsandveggies.JPG
Climbing that Mountain
You may have been considering making positive lifestyle changes for a long time. You'd love to lose a few pounds, maybe more than a few, and you'd love to be one of those people who somehow find the time to exercise every day. It's certainly true that for people who make their own schedules it's easier to plan time for exercise and food preparation. It is somewhat tougher for those who work on a more formal schedule and for those who are raising children. But regardless of your specific situation and your specific circumstances, each of us gets to choose how we're going to find the time to do things that are in our long-term interest.
A truism is that if things don't get scheduled, they don't get done. For people very busy with commuting to work and raising a family, finding time to exercise might require getting up an hour earlier each day or going to bed an hour later each night. That's just one of the many possibilities for "expanding" one's day. The good news is that once you're doing this, you become highly motivated to continue doing it because you begin to feel better and reap the benefits of your new health-focused schedule.
What is your lifestyle? Not whether you are married or where you live, but rather, how are you choosing to live your life? What choices are you making to keep yourself and your family healthy and well?
It is startling to learn that some of the most prevalent causes of illness, disease, and death - including cancer, heart disease, and diabetes - are all heavily influenced by lifestyle. For example, we don't usually think of cancer as a lifestyle disease. We think a person is unlucky if they have cancer, and often we have a fatalistic outlook toward news that someone has developed cancer. "It's in their genes," we say. Or "stuff happens - the luck of the draw."
But only approximately 10% of cancers are based on genetics. The vast majority of cancer cases are very much related to how we live our lives - our environment, the food we eat, whether we exercise regularly, and the quality of our relationships. Within the last ten years medical researchers have been learning of the strong correlation between overweight/obesity and a person's likelihood of developing cancer. It seems that fat cells are not merely passive storehouses of excess energy in the form of fat. Fat cells are metabolic furnaces that spew out a wide range of chemicals, including hormones and inflammatory agents that may often cause normal cells and tissues to become cancerous.1
Most people and even some physicians are unaware of these facts. The connection between lifestyle and heart disease, and between lifestyle and type 2 diabetes, seems obvious.2,3 But cancer, too, is a lifestyle disease. The very good news is that by creating the willingness to make healthy lifestyle choices, you're making positive long-term changes in your health and well-being.
Additional good news is that these choices are in your hands. Every day you get to choose a healthy lifestyle or not. Of course, some days or even some weeks just seem to go by without a real opportunity to do things that are healthy. You might be on a business trip in a country where it's difficult to find good, nutritious healthy food. It might also be difficult to find the time to exercise when you're on a travel schedule. That's OK, though, because lifestyle is a lifetime project. If you're eating healthful nutritious food most of the time and doing daily exercise most of the time, you can take a week off or even two weeks off here and there. The main goal is to be on a healthy lifestyle path the vast majority of the time.
Chiropractic care is an important component of healthy living. Chiropractic care helps ensure that your body is functioning at its maximum. Chiropractic care helps ensure you're getting the most out of the healthy food you're eating and the healthy exercise you're doing. Your chiropractor will be glad to provide guidance on creating nutritional plans and exercise programs that will work for you.
1Chan AT, Giovannucci EL: Primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Gastroenterology 138(6):2029-2043, 2010
2Shi Y, et al: Cardiovascular determinants of life span. Pflugers Arch 459(2):315-324, 2010
3Ma J, et al: Evaluation of lifestyle interventions to treat elevated cardiometabolic risk in primary care (E-LITE): a randomized controlled trial. BMC Fam Pract 10:71, 2009

Do I Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?


Do I Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

carpal_tunnel_syndrome_200.png
Chiropractic Care and Musculoskeletal Pain 
Many musculoskeletal problems, including symptoms masquerading as carpal tunnel syndrome, are effectively managed by chiropractic care. The key, as always, lies in accurate evaluation of the cause of the patient's pain patterns.
To a very large extent, physical pain involving the spine, arms, and legs is related to mechanical joint dysfunction. There are exceptions, of course, including pain caused by a severe acute injury or an inflammatory condition such as ankylosing spondylitis. But in most cases, chiropractic care will provide a solution to a person's musculoskeletal pain, resulting in a reduction or even a resolution of the problem.
It's important to remember that most painful symptoms don't just happen on their own. Your chiropractor will do more than address the problem at hand. He or she may also help you design an effective exercise program and a healthful nutrition plan to optimize your health and well-being over the long-term.
Many people believe they have carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The majority have been told by their medical doctor that they have CTS. Others have mistakenly concluded that because they have some numbness and tingling in their wrist or hand, they must have this neurological disorder. Still others have ongoing forearm, wrist, or hand pain (possibly localized to the thumb and/or index finger), and are led by articles they've read on the Internet to diagnose themselves with CTS. Almost all of this is in error.1,2

Why are so many diagnoses of this condition mistaken? The primary culprit is lazy clinical decision-making, compounded by a failure to understand correctly the workings of the musculoskeletal system. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a specific diagnosis which involves mechanical pressure on the median nerve as it passes through a small tunnel in the wrist created by tiny adjoining bones. There's not much room in this carpal tunnel and its dimensions can be narrowed further by inflammatory conditions such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Pregnancy can lead to CTS owing to increased fluid retention. Repetitive stress may lead to inflammation of tendons that cross the wrist. Such inflammation may lead to soft tissue swelling which compresses the carpal tunnel, causing CTS. Various other disorders should also be considered when CTS is suspected.

Importantly, CTS is not a catchall diagnosis to be used when a person has forearm, wrist, and/or hand pain. If a person really has CTS, he or she will have specific symptoms. The person will awaken at night owing to pain and/or numbness and tingling. Symptoms will be precisely located to the thumb and index finger (possibly involving the middle finger). Wrist pain may or may not be present. Also, the person will demonstrate a weakness of pinch grip involving the thumb and index finger. If these signs and symptoms are not present, the person does not have carpal tunnel syndrome. Usually, the diagnosis is clearcut and does not require special tests such as electromyography.

Remarkably, most physicians, regardless of specialty, are unaware of these important criteria. If the patient has pain and/or numbness in the hand, the patient has CTS. Case closed. This lack of sophistication leads to real harm done to the patient, such as unnecessary tests which waste time, cost a lot of money, and may result in damaging surgery which is not curative as it was directed at a problem that really wasn't there.

In marked contrast, chiropractors are highly trained in accurate analysis of musculoskeletal problems involving the shoulder, arm, and hand.3 When patients have symptoms mimicking those of carpal tunnel syndrome, chiropractors use their broad knowledge and experience to correctly evaluate the situation. For example, spinal dysfunction, muscle spasm, and trigger points can all cause symptoms which appear to be those of CTS. Chiropractors are able to see through this masquerade and effectively address the real underlying problems.

1Ibrahim I, et al: Carpal tunnel syndrome. Review of the recent literature. Open Orthop J 6:69-75, 2012
2Uchiyama S, et al: Current concepts of carpal tunnel syndrome: pathophysiology, treatment, and evaluation. J Orthop Sci 15(1):1-13, 2010
3Bialosky JE, et al: Heightened pain sensitivity in individuals with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and the relationship to clinical outcomes following a manual therapy intervention. Man Ther 16(6):602-608, 2011

Top Three Fitness Tips from the World of Dance


Top Three Fitness Tips from the World of Dance

dance_200.jpg
Chiropractic Care Helps You Get the Most from Exercise
When we exercise we often come up against our physical limitations. Tight back muscles or tight hamstrings can frequently limit what we're able to do. Tight shoulders and tight hips create other kinds of restrictions. Occasionally, such physical limitations can lead to injury.
Chiropractic care helps remove the roadblocks that are causing these issues. Your chiropractor analyzes your musculoskeletal system, paying special attention to your spine, and uses gentle treatment to correct misalignments and joint dysfunctions. By restoring more normal biomechanics, your chiropractor enhances your ability to exercise fully and freely. Additionally, your chiropractor may make recommendations regarding safer, smarter, and more efficient methods of stretching, warming up, and cooling down. As a result, over time you gain more and more benefit, reaping the rewards of time well spent.
Professional dancers are a pretty select group. These elite athletes are arguably among the fittest people in the world. Dance training provides flexibility, strength, speed, and agility - qualities of which we'd all like to have more. As a result, the dancer's experience provides lifelong guidance for the rest of us as we pursue our own fitness-and-exercise quest.1,2,3

Here are three key fitness tips from the dance world:

1. Hard Work. Dance training provides everything an athlete needs. But there's a lot of personal discipline and effort involved. That said, the results are magnificent. If we want comparable [for us] magnificent results, we must put in the time. We must do the hard work.

2. Process and Practice. Dancers know they're in it for the long haul. They're committed to the process of becoming a dancer and to the practice required to get where they want to go. It's a goal that takes years to accomplish and it's a goal that has no end-point.

Adults who want to get fit, be fit, and stay fit need to remember this long timeline. Fitness doesn't happen in a month or even three months. Sure, you can make good fitness gains, getting slimmer and stronger, having more endurance. But the real power comes from embracing the process and practice of fitness. The real power comes from a long-term commitment to being fit, healthy, and well. To being willing to take small steps, just as dancers literally do, day after day.

3. Mind-Set. A dancer's mind-set is all about the moment, it's all about the work-at-hand. Looked at from this perspective, being a dancer is a Zen process. The work of dance is the work of right-now. Whatever a dancer is doing in the moment has to be the best that dancer can do. Otherwise, what's the point? If the work of the moment isn't the very best you can do, you'll learn nothing, gain nothing, and your time and effort are wasted. More importantly, neither you, nor your body, nor your brain will grow.

Dancers learn these lessons in their very first class. Maximum effort is required all the time. It is supremely exciting and life-affirming to be part of such demanding activity. Strength training can be just like this. Running can be just like this. All our core exercise classes, spin classes, and yoga classes can be just like this, too.

What we can learn from dance and dancers is the value of bringing a total-commitment mind-set to all our fitness activities. Of course, there will be days when we don't completely get our act together. That's fine. That's part of what it means to be human. Our level of commitment is what keeps us going. Dancers know this. Deep in their muscles, deep in their bones. We can all learn a great deal from their approach to health and fitness.

1Rinne MB, et al: Is generic physical activity or specific exercise associated with motor abilities? Med Sci Sports Exerc 42(9):1760-1768, 2010
2Cowen VS: Functional fitness improvements after a worksite-based yoga initiative. J Bodyw Mov Ther 14(1):50-54, 2010
3Granacher U, et al: Effects of a Salsa Dance Training on Balance and Strength Performance in Older Adults. Gerontology 2012 Jan 6 [Epub ahead of print]

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Want to improve your sex life? Eat this, not that


Want to improve your sex life? Eat this, not that

Let's dispel some myths about traditional aphrodisiacs and focus our diets on the power of green — as in green, leafy vegetables.

By Jennifer NelsonWed, Oct 10 2012 at 2:33 PM EST

Couple in bed, eating saladsPhoto: mast3r/Shutterstock
Planning a romantic evening? You might think a juicy steak, a good bottle of wine and some chocolate will set the stage. But you’d be wrong.
 
Saturated fats from meats, alcohol and chocolate are the exact things you’ll want to avoid for good sex. Each is filled with chemicals and stimulants that have the opposite effect on libido and performance.
 
“If the body is spending its time and energy cleaning itself constantly from these chemicals we put in it, it cannot begin to perform at its peak sexually,” says Brian Clement, Ph.D., L.N.C., the co-director of the Hippocrates Health Institute in West Palm Beach and co-author with his wife of "7 Keys to Lifelong Sexual Vitality."
 
“One-third of young marrieds have fertility problems today and instead of seeing men with performance problems at age 70 the way we did a few decades ago, we now see it at age 40,” says Clement. “Fifty percent of 40-year-old men cannot perform.”
 
“Almost everyone we see here at the institute asks about their sexual health,” says Anna Maria Clement, PhD, L.N.C., part of the husband-wife duo and co-director at Hippocrates, a leading institute in natural and complementary healthcare.
 
The Clements’ attribute heavy metals, air pollution, food toxins, pesticides, fungicides, herbicides and soda consumption for contaminating and weakening the cell systems in the body leading to sexual libido and performance issues in both men and women.
 
Worse, many times Viagra is being used as a recreational drug. The number one user group is now men between 20-28 years old. But Dr. Brian Clement warns that the drug over-stimulates the libido, leaving men who abuse it unable to perform by the time they are in their 30s or 40s.
 
What can you do to improve your sexual health naturally? Throw out old myths about aphrodisiacs, as we’ve been accustomed to thinking of them. Named for Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of sex and beauty, these include an array of foods like oysters, because they “resembled” reproductive organs, and chocolate, the fatty acids of which negatively affect organs like the liver and gallbladder. Also skip:
 
  • Bacon, sausage and other fatty meats, which contain high levels of saturated fats and cholesterol, which clog the penal and vaginal arteries since they are so small and quickly collect plaque. Once plaque forms, you can have difficulty achieving and maintaining arousal and orgasm.
  • Dairy. Saturated fats in most cheeses are comparable to those found in fatty meats. Your worst lunch option? A bacon cheeseburger and chocolate milkshake!
  • Processed baked goods. Even when the products say “No Trans Fats,” chances are they’re present. Ingredients may exclude trans fats, but because of the way baked goods are processed, trans fats are often created during baking.
  • Soy-based products are high in estrogen, which can lower male sex drive and increase the risk of disease and testosterone in women.
 
The better sex diet
To really get your blood moving, circulation-enhancing foods are key. Food that's high in omega-3 fatty acids like mackerel, salmon and wild salmon are tops. Improved circulation results in greater erectile response, helpful for improving sexual function in men — and in women, too, since blood flows to the clitoris and surrounding vulva.
 
What you should reach for:
  • Carrots, a well-known libido enhancer, loaded with vitamin E
  • Green leafy veggies, which clean blood and open capillaries effectively
  • Avocados are fuel for cells with their essential fatty acids
  • Watermelon contains phytochemicals to open blood cells
 
The new focus is on all natural, healthy, good-for-sex foods. Ingredients like mustard greens, spinach, baby kale and pea shoots work well. Ditto for pumpkin seeds, figs, nutmeg, black raspberries, Jerusalem artichokes and yams.
 
Foods that promote weight loss also hold libido-boosting potential. Since obesity is a risk factor for erectile dysfunction, reducing weight can increase testosterone and enhance performance.
 
Bottom-line: Foods that are good for your heart are also good for your sex organs. The same foods that clog arteries and bring on heart attacks (think greasy burger and fries) are generally going to cramp your love life over time and should only be eaten occasionally since they prevent blood flow from reaching the genitals, affecting performance — and pleasure.
 
So go ahead, have the sex salad!

Monday, October 8, 2012

The Mysteries of Injuries


The Mysteries of Injuries

mysteries_of_injuries_200.png
Chiropractic Care, Injury Recovery, and Injury Prevention
Underlying causes of sports- and exercise-related injuries often involve complex biomechanical imbalances. A person may spend vast amounts of precious time and money trying to find effective therapy, but still may not achieve a permanent solution until they begin chiropractic care.
Chiropractic care specifically addresses biomechanical issues at their source by detecting, analyzing, and correcting imbalances in spinal joints and spinal muscles. The spinal column is the body's mechanical center. All efficient movement - involving the torso, pelvis, legs, and arms - begins with proper functioning of the spinal column.
By identifying and correcting various spinal imbalances, your chiropractor will help you recover from your injury faster and help you prevent new injuries in the future. The overall result is greater enjoyment of the time you spend exercising and greater benefit from new and improved levels of fitness.
A person with an exercise- or sports-related injury has many questions: When can I start exercising? When can I get back to my sport? What can I do to prevent this from happening again? The answers to these questions are relatively straightforward. But for some, injuries continue to happen. Which leads to the key question: Why did this happen to me?1,2

This is the hardest to answer. Some injuries may occur even when you're doing the things you're supposed to be doing. Sometimes you just have to shrug your shoulders and move on. But it's also very important to continue to try to discover the underlying causes.

If we dig deeper, we'll find that there are three main sources of training injuries: (1) under-preparation, (2) over-training, and (3) lack of focus or not paying attention.

Under-preparation means doing things you're not ready to do. People who have never done aerobic exercise go out and try to run five miles. People who have never done strength training go to the gym and try to lift weights that are too heavy. People who have never taken a yoga class go to one, like it, and then go every day for a week.

These exercise patterns can be dangerous, physically, and may directly lead to injury. A 16-year-old teenager has some leeway and can get away with making a variety of training errors. This may even be true for those who are in their mid-20s. But persons who are older need to train on a trajectory. Good principles to follow include starting slowly, starting with the basics, and making sure to include rest days in your training program. Build up your strength and stamina. Doing more than you're ready to do will send you straight to your chiropractor's office or even to the hospital.

Over-training means doing too much. Most of us are guilty of this. For example, you love to run, you build up your weekly mileage to a good level, but then you keep piling on distance. All of a sudden you've got a stress fracture in your leg or a bad strain of a calf muscle.

How do you know when you're over-training? The key is to train smart, and to be aware of the possibility of over-training. The temptation to do more is always there, but the result is never good. The short-term gratification is completely outweighed by the frustration and loss of conditioning resulting from injury-enforced down-time.

What about focus and paying attention? Many injuries happen during normal training because the person's mind wandered off. People pay more attention to the TV or to their incoming text messages than they do to the equipment they're using or the weight they're lifting. The result is an injury, sometimes a bad one. In fact, you're very unlikely to sustain an injury during normal training if you're completely focused. Maintaining focus is part of the discipline of training. 

But even if a person is doing all the right things, aren't there underlying issues that may predispose that person to injury? The easy answer is "yes". The hard part is to accurately assess and possibly diagnose such issues.3

A big part of the assessment process is the acquisition of knowledge. In the realm of exercise and fitness, some personal knowledge of biomechanics can go a very long way toward preventing injuries. Your chiropractor can help you learn more about human biomechanics and physical performance.

1Chow JW, Knudsen DV: Use of deterministic models in sports and exercise biomechanics research. Sports Biomech 10(3):219-233, 2011
2Stergiou N, Decker LM: Human movement variability, nonlinear dynamics, and pathology: is there a connection? Hum Mov Sci 30(5):869-888, 2011
3Carter CW, Micheli LJ: Training the child athlete: physical fitness, health and injury. Br J Sports Med 45(11):880-885, 2011

The Three Ps


The Three Ps

3_ps_200.png
Chiropractic Care and the Road to Good Health
We need to make sure we have every advantage so as to do well in our increasingly stressful world. Good health is a key factor that impacts all aspects of our daily affairs. Therefore, taking steps to ensure optimal wellness provides a payoff in multiple arenas.
These steps include making sure we’re eating nutritious foods. Importantly, these steps also include getting regular chiropractic care. Nutritious foods, including fresh fruits and vegetables, organic grains, healthy sources of protein, and plenty of water, provide the building blocks for active cells, tissues, and organs. Regular chiropractic care helps ensure that these valuable resources get used properly. When information is flowing freely between the nerve system and the digestive system, thanks to regular chiropractic care, you’re able to put that good food you're eating to work.
Pasta, pizza, and peanut butter. We've all been there. For some of us, these three delicious, yet nutritionally limited, pantry items constituted our three main food groups for months, if not years of our 20s and 30s, possibly even our 40s. But there comes a time when the party's over and we need to deal with reality in the form of tight clothes that used to fit nicely, expanding waistlines, and other unwanted signs of overweight and general lack of fitness.

The fact is that each of the three Ps is high in nutritive value when they are composed of organic ingredients. Pasta that is not organic probably is manufactured from processed flour and has lost most of its original nutritional quality. The same is true for pizza and peanut butter. Organic pizza actually covers three food groups - grains, fruits and vegetables, and dairy. Organic peanut butter is high in protein and essential fatty acids. So the three Ps are good for you. The problem, of course, is when they represent the majority of your weekly food intake.

What is a "well-rounded, healthful food plan", actually? The basic answer is provided by the well-known food pyramid. The   federal government (the U.S. Department of Agriculture) has recently replaced the traditional food pyramid with MyPlate, which is simplistic and not necessary an improvement.  The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) has designed a Healthy Eating Plate graphic which is more detailed and provides better guidance. The general rules are to fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, fill one-quarter of your plate with whole grains, and fill one-quarter of your plate with a protein source such as fish, chicken, beans, and/or nuts. The Healthy Eating Plate reminds people to drink plenty of water and to use healthy oils. The graphic contains information on choosing whole grains and how to select healthy fruits and vegetables.

Overall, this tool is an excellent resource and may be used in combination with the Healthy Eating Pyramid, created by the Department of Nutrition at HSPH. When a family takes the action steps recommended by these tools and applies the "five to stay alive" rule (the recommendation to eat at least five portions of fruits and vegetables each day),1 both adults and children will be well on their way to improved health and wellness.2

Eating a well-rounded diet takes some effort. That's a main reason why so many adults default to the three Ps. Pasta, pizza, and peanut butter are not only fun to eat, they are also easy to prepare. But over time, relying on the three Ps for your nutritional needs will lead to problems.3 In contrast, the guidelines recommended by the Healthy Eating Plate, in association with "five to stay alive" principle, will provide a delicious, nutritionally sound food plan. We greatly assist our long-term health and that of our children when we begin to recognize the value of these guidelines, and are willing to spend a little extra time and effort at the market and in the kitchen to put the recommendations into action.

1Liu RH: Potential synergy of phytochemicals in cancer prevention: mechanism of action. J Nutr 134(Suppl 12):3479S-3485S, 2004
2Wang YC, et al: Reaching the health people goals for reducing childhood obesity: closing the energy gap. Am J Prev Med 42(5):437-444, 2012
3Drewnowski A, et al: Sweetness and food preference. J Nutr 142(6):1142S-1148S, 2012

Heroes - Active Parents Raise Active Kids


Heroes - Active Parents Raise Active Kids

Above_Down_200.jpg
Chiropractic Care and Family Health
Parents take care of their children in many ways, providing food and shelter in addition to love and caring. An additional important component of successful child-rearing is is providing good health care.
Regular medical check-ups are needed, as are regular chiropractic check-ups. Healthy kids are active kids. Running, jumping, and falling down are all part of a child's normal day. Regular chiropractic check-ups help make sure that a kid's daily dose of physical fun doesn't cause any problems for her bones, muscles, joints, and nerve system.
Such subtle problems are often undetected and may lead to pain later on. Chiropractic check-ups are specifically designed to look for these mechanical problems. Detecting and correcting any spinal misalignments or other musculoskeletal issues will go a long way toward helping ensure your child's health and well-being.
We are constantly searching the landscape for heroes. This is not to fill in a missing piece in ourselves, but rather represents an ongoing search for inspiration, stimulation, and motivation. Even those of us who are self-starters need coaches and mentors to cause us to reach ever-higher levels of achievement. In this, we all need support. We all need guidance. We all need fresh perspectives. 

Children, in particular, need guidance. Kids need rules. Kids need structure. Usually, a child's parents are her leaders or role models. Other relatives, teachers, peers, and older kids may also fill these roles.

Let's consider parents, relatives, and teachers - the adults in a kid's environment. In America, one-third of all adults are obese. An additional one-third of adults are overweight. Almost one-half of American adults do not do any vigorous physical activity. Three-quarters of adults do not get enough physical activity to meet public health recommendations.

The awful bottom line is that the majority of Americans are out-of-shape and overweight or obese. These adults are the role models for their kids. The result is that one-third of American children are overweight or obese.1 Juvenile diabetes is an epidemic that is getting worse every year. Type 2 diabetes, previously rare in young people, is now a commonly recognized diagnosis in kids. Hypertension is increasing in prevalence in teenagers. 

We're in the midst of a healthcare disaster. Diabetes and obesity are twin raging epidemics endangering the health and welfare of our nation's young people. In New York City, by the age of 4, there is a one in three chance that the child will be obese. More than 40% of children are at an unhealthy weight at ages 2 and 3.  National statistics are similar.2

Type II diabetes, long known as "adult-onset diabetes", is now being recognized as a significant juvenile disorder. Up to 45% of the children diagnosed with diabetes have the type II form.  And the numbers keep increasing. Additionally, studies demonstrate that almost two-thirds of American kids aged 9 through 13 do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. Twenty-five percent do not engage in ANY free-time physical activity.

Kids mimic the habits of their parents or other significant adults. If the adults eat cheeseburgers and fries three times a week, so will the kids. If adults don't eat fresh fruits and vegetables, neither will the kids. Also, if kids see their parents putting on more and more weight, they will put on more and more weight. If adults spend no time exercising, neither will the kids.

Luckily, the converse is also true, and this is where parents can become heroes to their kids - literally, saving their kids' lives. If kids see their parents choosing healthy behaviors and being positive and supportive about doing so, kids will begin to choose those healthy behaviors, too. Let's start to teach our kids that exercise can be fun.3,4 Strength training, aerobic exercise, core exercises can all be incorporated into family games and fitness activities. Also, let's start to teach our kids that healthy eating can be fun - nurturing as well as nutritious. Shopping, cooking, and mealtimes can all become key components of a healthy family lifestyle.

All children need the love and support and guidance of the important adults in their lives. It's up to us, those important adults, to really BE the role models kids so desperately need and want.

1Berman LJ, et al: Physical activity is related to insulin sensitivity in children and adolescents, independent of adiposity: a review of the literature. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 
2012 March 2 [Epub ahead of print]
2Fagot-Campagna A: Emergence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children: Epidemiological evidence. Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism 13(Suppl 6): S1395-S1402, 2000.
3Feda DM, et al: Effect of increasing the choice of active options on children's physically active play. J Sci Med Sport 2012 February 16 [Epub ahead of print]
4Ekelund U: Moderate to vigorous physical activity and sedentary time and cardiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents. JAMA 307(7):704-712, 2012