Saturday, August 28, 2010

Treating Fibromyalgia?

Treating Fibromyalgia?

A friend on my list sent out a bulletin regarding how to treat Fibromyalgia, So I thought others may like to be educated on the subject...

Fibromyalgia is Very hard to treat... chiropractice adjustments with massages and life style changes seems to be the best treatments... these people need to get rid of the toxins that they are consuming on a regular basis (carbs, refined sugar, processed food, etc...) and start suppling the body with the raw nutrients that it needs to survive... organic fruits/veggies and grass feed meats... they need to get on a great multivitamin with lots of b-complex and omega 3 fish oils...

here are some more supplementations that seems to work on some and not on others

1.) Magnesium
several studies have found these patients to be Mg deficient. other studies found Mg to be so effective for enough patients so as to reach statistical significance
the hypothesis is that it results in .. ATP production (these patients don..t make enough ATP) 600 mg MG
Mg can..t be taken on its own, it needs to be liked with something else (ie. Mg oxide, Mg sulfate, Mg malate, etc) otherwise it burns

2.) Malic Acid
studies show it is helpful for a lot of patients
important in ATP production or may have other effects
2000-2500 mg/day. good if linked with Mg (Mg malate supplement) then it will be 600mg Mg /2400mg malic acid

3.) Vit B1
100mg/day. injections are more effective than oral supplements

4.) Vit B6
works for some. 100-200 mg/day

5.) Tryptophan
it was banned in the 1950..s because it got contaminated 5-hydroxy tryptophan (now used)
increases serotonin levels, fibromyalgia pts found to be low in serotonin- which may be why they have abnormal sleep and tend to depression
100 mg, 3 times/day, can produce diarrhea (regular tryptophan didn..t have this effect)- so suggest starting it slow

6.) s-adenosyl methionine (SAMEE)
an expensive supplement!, 200 mg/day (the minimum/day) = $100 for a 1 month supply
at least 3 studies found it very effective at treating fibromyalgia, but most pts can..t afford it
1200 mg = the effective dose, it forms homocysteine so pts now also have to take a lot of folic acid as well
we don..t know how it helps except that it functions to:
.. transcription of RNA, it is a primary methyl-donor in the body

7.) Ribose
5-carbon sugar, can help fibromyalgia pts but no one knows why, 2-4 grams/day

8.) Vit D
some think fibromyalgia to be a manifestation of a Vit D deficiency, those taking a lot of Vit D supp. are much improved, helps people with just muscle aches and on fibromyalgia

Hope this helps
Dr. Jon


Read more: http://www.myspace.com/Dr_JonWise/blog?page=3#ixzz0xuu5EE3q

John Hopkins Hospital on Cancer

Info from John Hopkins Hospital on Cancer
A very interesting article.

AFTER YEARS OF TELLING PEOPLE CHEMOTHERAPY IS THE ONLY WAY TO TRY ( TRY
THE KEY WORD ) AND ELIMINATE CANCER, JOHN HOPKINS IS FINALLY STARTING TO
TELL YOU THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY . This is an amazing article that will
encourage and inform anyone you know who might be dealing with these issues.

Cancer Update from John Hopkins
1. Every person has cancer cells in the body. These cancer cells do not
show up in the standard tests until they have multiplied to a few billion.
When doctors tell cancer patients that there are no more cancer cells in
their bodies after treatment, it just means the tests are unable to detect
the cancer cells because they have not reached the detectable size.

2. Cancer cells occur between 6 to more than 10 times in a person's
Lifetime.

3. When the person's immune system is strong the cancer cells will be
destroyed and prevented from multiplying and forming tumors.

4. When a person has cancer it indicates the person has multiple
nutritional deficiencies. These could be due to genetic, environmental, food
and lifestyle factors.

5. To overcome the multiple nutritional deficiencies, changing diet and
including supplements will strengthen the immune system.

6. Chemotherapy involves poisoning the rapidly-growing cancer cells and
also destroys rapidly-growing healthy cells in the bone marrow,
gastro-intestinal
tract etc, and can cause organ damage, like liver, kidneys, heart, lungs
etc.

7. Radiation while destroying cancer cells also burns, scars and damages
healthy cells, tissues and organs.

8. Initial treatment with chemotherapy and radiation will often reduce
tumor size. However prolonged use of chemo therapy and radiation do not
result in more
tumor destruction.

9 When the body has too much toxic burden from chemotherapy and radiation
the immune system is either compromised or destroyed, hence the person
can succumb to various kinds of infections and complications.

10. Chemotherapy and radiation can cause cancer cells to mutate and become
resistant and difficult to destroy. Surgery can also cause cancer cells to
spread to other sites.

11. An effective way to battle cancer is to starve the cancer cells by not
feeding it with the foods it needs to multiply.

CANCER CELLS FEED ON:
a. Sugar is a cancer-feeder. By cutting off sugar it cuts off one important
food supply to the cancer cells. Sugar substitutes like NutraSweet,Equal,
Spoonful, etc are made with Aspartame and it is harmful. A better natural
substitute would be Manuka honey or molasses but only in very smallamounts.
Table salt has chemicals added to make it white in color. Better alternative
is Bragg's aminos or sea salt.

b. Milk causes the body to produce mucus, especially in the
gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer feeds on mucus. By cutting off milk and
substituting with unsweetened soya milk cancer cells are being starved.

c. Cancer cells thrive in an acid environment. A meat-based diet is
acidicand it is best to eat fish, and a little chicken rather than beef or
pork. Meat also contains livestock antibiotics, growth hormones and
parasites, which are all harmful, especially to people with cancer.

d. A diet made of 80% fresh vegetables and juice, whole grains, seeds, nuts
and a little fruits help put the body into an alkaline environment. About
20% can be from cooked food including beans. Fresh vegetable juices provide
live enzymes that are easily absorbed and reach down to cellular levels
within
15 minutes to nourish and enhance growth of healthy cells. To obtain live
enzymes for building healthy cells try and drink fresh vegetable juice most
vegetables including bean sprouts) and eat some raw vegetables 2 or 3 times
a day. Enzymes are destroyed at temperatures of 104 degrees F (40 degrees
C).

e. Avoid coffee, tea, and chocolate, which have high caffeine.Green tea is a
better alternative and has cancer-fighting properties. Water is best to
drink, purified water, or filtered, to avoid known toxins and heavy metals
in tap water. Distilled water is acidic, avoid it.

12. Meat protein is difficult to digest and requires a lot of digestive
enzymes. Undigested meat remaining in the intestines become putrified and
leads to more toxic buildup.

13. Cancer cell walls have a tough protein covering. By refraining from or
eating less meat it frees more enzymes to attack the protein walls of cancer
cells and allows the body's killer cells to destroy the cancer cells.

14. Some supplements build up the immune system ( IP6, Flor-ssence, Essiac,
anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, EFAs etc.) to enable the body's own
killer cells to destroy cancer cells. Other supplements like vitamin E are
known to cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, the body's normal method
of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.

15. Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. A proactive and
positive spirit will help the cancer warrior be a survivor. Anger,
unforgiveness and bitterness put the body into a stressful and acidic
environment. Learn to have a loving and forgiving spirit. Learn to relax and
enjoy life.

16. Cancer cells cannot thrive in an oxygenated environment. Exercising
daily, and deep breathing help to get more oxygen down to the cellular
level. Oxygen therapy is another means employed to destroy cancer cells.

( PLEASE FORWARD THIS TO PEOPLE YOU CARE ABOUT )
CANCER UPDATE FROM JOHN HOPKINS HOSPITAL , US - PLEASE READ

1. No plastic containers in microwave.

2. No water bottles in freezer.

3. No plastic wrap in microwave.

Johns Hopkins has recently sent this out in its newsletters. This
information is being circulated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as well.
Dioxin chemicals causes cancer, especially breast cancer.
Dioxins are highly poisonous to the cells of our bodies.
Don't freeze your plastic bottles with water in them as this releases
dioxins from the plastic. Recently, Dr. Edward Fujimoto, Wellness Program
Manager at Castle
Hospital, was on a TV program to explain this health hazard. He talked
about
dioxins and how bad they are for us.. He said that we should not be heating
our
food in the microwave using plastic containers. This especially applies to
foods that contain fat. He said that the combination of fat, high heat, and
plastics releases dioxin into the food and ultimately into the cells of the
body. Instead, he recommends using glass, such as Corning Ware, Pyrex or
ceramic containers for heating
food. You get the same results, only without the dioxin. So such things as
TV dinners, instant ramen and soups, etc., should be removed from the
container
and heated in something else.Paper isn't bad but you don't know what is in
the paper. It's just safer to use tempered glass, Corning Ware, etc. He
reminded us that a while ago some of the fast food restaurants moved away
from the foam containers to paper. The dioxin problem is one of the
reasons.
Also, he pointed out that plastic wrap, such as Saran, is just as dangerous
when placed over foods to be cooked in the microwave. As the food is nuked,
the high heat causes poisonous toxins to actually melt out of the plastic
wrap and drip into the food. Cover food with a paper towel instead.
This is an article that should be sent to anyone important in your life.


With the help of like minded people, We can make a difference in this world

Dr. Jonathan Wise


Read more: http://www.myspace.com/Dr_JonWise/blog?page=2#ixzz0xutKKiRF

What is Wellnessology?

What is Wellnessology?
I want to thank Dr. Miller for his expertise knowledge on the subject

Dr. Jon

What is Wellnessology? - Dr. Brian Miller

"A revolution is coming - a revolution which will be peaceful if we are wise enough; compassionate if we care enough; successful if we are fortunate enough - but a revolution which is coming whether we will it or not. We can affect its character, we cannot alter its inevitability." John F. Kennedy

You are about to embark on an incredible journey- a journey that will not only inspire, educate and amuse you, but will ultimately change your life and empower you to take action. Wellnessology is a systemized approach for a better quality of life and has been in development over the last hundred years. It is not a fad or a book-of-the-month. It is a common sense way of living based on fundamental truths that have been studied over thousands of years of recorded history. From Hippocrates to Hawking, its teachings are based on science and philosophy.

With the exponential advancement of technology, new information is being discovered every day and the science and art
of Wellnessology will be continually updated. The one thing that will remain constant is the philosophy. Philosophy is the backbone to Wellnessology and, as you will soon learn, is backed by hard science and, of course, is debatable but ultimately indisputable.


Wellnessology and Health

Over the last twenty years, I have asked thousands of individuals what they think health is and inevitably got the same answer; "Well doc, it's about feeling good and having no symptoms". Although feeling good is important, it is a small part of what health really is. Health is currently a highly debated topic among many so-called experts, whose views usually range from somewhat ridiculous to downright dangerous.

In order to study and therefore understand a new philosophy, we must start with some important definitions. This way we can set the groundwork, begin on a clean slate, without prejudice, and build up from the foundation. If we are going to have a rational discussion about health, we first need to define it.

For a complete definition of health, let's go to Dorland's Medical Dictionary that defines Health as "optimal physical, mental, and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease and infirmities." This is the same definition used by the World Health Organization. Now that's different than what most people think. There is a greater dimension to health than just the absence of disease and infirmities. We have been trained by society to go to the doctor when we feel bad and stop going when we feel good. The fact is, judging your health by how you feel can be a very dangerous practice. Here are some examples.
The Magic Pill

I have an important question for you and I want you to answer it honestly. If I gave you a magic herbal pill that was all natural, you only had to take it once, had no side-effects and you would never, ever feel pain again, would you take it? Of course you would. You want to be pain free, right?

Okay, you have just taken the magic pill and turn to me and say, "Wow, I feel great and I am completely out of pain. Thanks doc." You excitedly walk out of my office, feeling great, and step on a big rusty nail that goes right through the bottom of your shoe and deep into your foot. But you can't feel it. Your shoe is now filling up with blood and you go home to cook dinner. While preparing your meal, with a nail in your foot, you accidentally put your hand on the hot stove and soon smell something burning. Remember, you feel no pain. Your hand is now on fire with third degree burns and you can't feel a thing.

Next question. Would you still take my magic pill? I sure hope not. Does not feeling pain mean that you are healthy or unhealthy? Does feeling pain (when you are supposed to) mean that you are healthy or unhealthy? Unknowingly, you have been trained by your parents, doctors and billion dollar drug companies that pain and symptoms are always bad.

Let's look at two top killers of Americans today, heart disease and cancer. By the time you feel symptoms you are, unfortunately, already in the advanced stages of these diseases. Could you imagine, after a large suspicious tumor is found on your mammogram, telling your doctor "I feel fine and I am going to wait until my breast hurts before I do anything about it?" How about finding out that your coronary arteries are 90% occluded but you want to wait until you get chest pain and shortness of breath before you do anything about it. That sounds crazy, right?

The opposite is also true. Every time you take a pill to stop a symptom that your body is producing, you run the risk of driving the condition deeper. If you have mucous in your lungs and your body is telling you to cough to get that microbe-filled mucous up and out, why would you take a drug to stop it? Is coughing when there is mucous a healthy response or is taking a drug to suppress the cough healthy? Do you know the correct answer? Keep reading.


But he was so healthy

Do you remember the two-time Olympic figure skating champion Sergei Grinkov? In 1995 the 28 year-old athlete collapsed on the ice while practicing a routine with his wife (his skating partner). He had a massive heart attack. Bob Young, the executive director of the International Skating Center said, "I've never seen anyone in better condition. Never. I'd put him up against any athlete in any sport. I never even knew him to be sick."

According to cardiologist Dr. Bernard Gersh, "30% of heart attacks are silent" and "many times, in young people the first symptom of coronary artery disease is sudden death." After working with thousands of patients with all types of conditions, I will be the first to admit that sudden death is not a good symptom. Was Sergei healthy? He was obviously fit. He looked healthy. As an Olympic athlete, I am sure he had the best trainer, medical team and nutritionist that money could buy. So, what happened? We will explore the possibilities of this tragedy in Chapter 6.


Things that make you go hmmm

Do you know anybody that was diagnosed with cancer that you thought was healthy? If so, this next statement might shock you. Healthy people do not and cannot get cancer. Healthy people do not have heart attacks or get arthritis. The fact is that you have to be unhealthy to develop a disease (according to cancer experts, it can take years to decades before a tumor could grow to the size of a pea and be detectable). Are you unhealthy before or after the diagnosis? The body had to have already been sick to develop cancer. Does vomiting and having diarrhea mean that you are sick, or could it actually mean that you are healthy? Does a cough and a fever mean that you need medication, or is it your body's innate way (after thousands of generations of immune system evolution) of eliminating microbes and toxins? What would happen if you ate rotten food and didn't throw up? Are symptoms good or bad? Do you take a pill or potion every time you feel a symptom? I sure hope not because you are stopping the recuperative powers of the body and doing more harm than good.

These are important questions to ask yourself because your symptoms are your body's way of staying healthy. Let me reiterate. You cannot judge your health by how you feel, and most symptoms are actually good for you. This is a difficult but very
important concept to grasp and by the time you finish this book, you will have a good understanding of it. This is not a new concept. Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, wrote on the topic almost 2500 years ago:

"Diseases are crisis of purification, of toxic elimination. Symptoms are the natural defenses of the body. We call them diseases, but in fact they are the cure of diseases". Hippocrates

The Health Formula

Another definition of health comes from Webster's dictionary which defines it as "a condition of wholeness in which all of the
organs are functioning 100% all the time." What is interesting
about this definition is that you actually get a mathematical formula for health:


HEALTH = ALL ORGANS x 100% FUNCTION
TIME

How do you optimize health with the use of this equation? You can see that this health formula reveals that you must have all your body parts, and these parts must be functioning optimally 100% of the time. You can do nothing about body parts that are missing (tonsils, appendix, etc.). You can do nothing about time in the past before you knew what health really was. There is, however, something you can do about today and your future. Keep Reading.

That leaves us with the key to the health formula and the only part of the equation that you have control over: function. The key to health is function. Improve function and you improve health. But what controls the function of your body? Let's go to the experts.

Gray's anatomy textbook utilized by most doctors and health institutions, tells us "the purpose of the brain and nerve system is to control and coordinate the Â'function' of all the tissues, organs, and systems of the body and adapt the organism (you) to its environment". You and your nerve system are ultimately responsible for your health. This is a scientific fact that is overlooked by most doctors. You have your teeth checked on a regular basis. When was the last time you had your nerve system evaluated, and do you take care of it on a regular basis? Wellnessology will show you how to optimize this most important system of your body.

Now that we know what health is and where it comes from, what is Wellness. Wellness can be defined as "ever-increasing health and vitality." That means that there is no limit to how healthy you can be and that the older you get the healthier you become, physically, mentally, socially, and spiritually. There are people in the world that live over 120 years of age with no diseases. (We will discuss them in detail in chapter five.)

Wellnessology is defined as "the study and application of the philosophy, art, and science of Wellness." It is the philosophy of
life - of our role in the big scheme of things. It is the art of living, learning techniques for not just self but global improvement. It is the science of life-exploring scientific endeavors that will optimize our existence from healthcare to agriculture, to biology, to transportation- in a way that is constructive, not destructive.

You must realize that as an individual you can do more for your health than any doctor. Health is not the plastic Blue Cross card that you carry in your wallet. It is your birthright and most prized possession. You and only you, are responsible for your health. With it you are able to meet physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual challenges of everyday life. Without it, a less than fulfilling existence awaits you.

God Don't Make No Junk

Wellnessology is about optimum potential and creating strategies to help you become the best you can be on all levels. The Universe, with its unlimited resources, designed you and expects you to be great. Mediocrity is not an option.


What would you rather be?

Fit or just not fat
Wealthy or just not poor
Alive or just not dead
Happy or not just sad
Healthy or just not sick

"Once you lick the lollipop of mediocrity, you suck forever". - Dr. Bob Hoffman

We are living in a time when the health of our leaders and decision-makers is at an all time low. Would a properly functioning parent or teacher abuse a child? Would a healthy politician pass a law that would poison the planet? Would a healthy researcher chemically blind an innocent animal for a new eye cream?

Can you imagine what our world would be like if it were filled with healthy productive citizens making healthy decisions and taking healthy action steps? Teachers, politicians, parents, researchers and preachers, would be working toward one major goal: global wellness.

Let me ask you another question. Would you rather be in pain because you have a splinter in your finger, or feel no pain but
have a cancerous tumor growing inside your body? The answers should now be more obvious.


Change or Fail

If we look at the socio-economic consequences of our current, soon-to-be bankrupt health-care system, we can see an expensive failure that is setting the stage for national disaster far worse than 9/11 or hurricane Katrina.

We are moving forward with technology, but moving backward with our health - physically, mentally, socially and spiritually. We have more disease than ever before, millions of children are still abused and starving, we are at war killing fellow humans for power, we are building new jails for more and more criminals, we are developing new weapons for destruction, we are poisoning the planet for convenience, and we are still experimenting on innocent animals for so-called health and beauty..... The list goes on and on. We are creating de-evolution. The good news is that we have the time and power to change. The big question is when?

Ultimately, the goal of Wellnessology is to improve the current short-term and long-term quality of life issues that we face as a society and on a bigger picture, to optimize the genetic code for a positive evolutionary process not for human beings alone, but for the entire planet.

Wellnessology incorporates not only philosophy of wellness, but the application of neurophysiology, spinal biomechanics, practical nutrition, detoxification, exercise, and psychological enhancement. It is a systemized approach for a better quality of life.


Read more: http://www.myspace.com/Dr_JonWise/blog#ixzz0xut2L3jd

The Well-Adjusted Spine!!!

The Well-Adjusted Spine!!!

How many visits does it take to have a well-adjusted spine? It depends on your definition of well-adjusted. For many patients who experience complete pain relief after their first adjustment, the answer might be one. But if you understand you can have a problem even without pain, you'll see that it takes a lifetime of minor tune-up visits to be at your best. These minor tune-ups also prevent many of the problems that can show up in your 40s and 50s.

It's important to look at the big picture to understand what is going to take place during your lifetime. This can help you see how chiropractic can work to preserve many of your body's functions and prevent degeneration of your spine.

Childhood and the Teen Years: In your first two decades of life, you will have indirect and direct stresses. Indirect stress is poor posture and direct stresses are sprains and strains from sports activities or other childhood traumas. These stresses, if left untreated, can lead to degeneration and other problems - such as arthritis - down the road.

Your 20s and 30s: This period of time is when your chiropractor can start to see the early stages of degeneration and arthritis that actually had its beginning in your childhood and teens. You may begin to experience diminished flexibility and joint aches and pains. Athletic performance typically begins to decline. The early signs of joint degeneration begin to appear on X-ray. These are all signs of long-standing physical decline, yet you still don't have pain most of the time.

Your 40s and 50s: This is the time frame during which we start to see the effects of arthritis. Generally this is when your activities start to become limited because of reduced muscle flexibility and joint pain. Chronic pain is commonplace and destruction of cartilage in the knees and hips often results in joint replacement surgery.

How to Prevent or Slow the Damage: Using a combination of proper diet, exercise, regular chiropractic adjustments and custom orthotics if necessary, you can have an active role in preventing damage (or slowing down the wear-and-tear process). Your chiropractor or nutritionist can suggest what you should be eating, but it's up to you to actually follow this plan and choose a healthy lifestyle. The five keys known to contribute to longevity are:

1. Don't smoke.
2. Eat 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables daily.
3. Drink plenty of water.
4. Drink alcohol in moderation.
5. Get regular exercise.


Getting exercise on a regular basis goes hand-in-hand with proper nutrition in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Here are some easy tips to get you started:

Start slow, gradually increasing the intensity of your workout.
Always warm-up and cool down when working out.
Drink plenty of water (8 ounces before you work out, 8 ounces while you work out and another 8 ounces after).
Listen to your body - stop exercising if you experience pain or dizziness.
Wear proper-fitting, supportive athletic shoes.


Being evaluated by your chiropractor even when you are pain-free can have a very valuable payoff in the later years. Healthy joints, muscle flexibility and a healthy nervous system will allow you to continue to exercise and be active, which we all know contributes to overall health. The key to a well-adjusted spine is starting early and continuing to keep your body in balance. This is a lifetime's approach to overall wellness and health.

Thanks for Reading
Dr. Jon Wise


Read more: http://www.myspace.com/Dr_JonWise/blog#ixzz0xusUFd6i

3 Big Lies That Are Holding Your Health Hostage

3 Big Lies That Are Holding Your Health Hostage
By Dr. Dale Ellwein

As you read every word in this post, you will be amazed at the crazy stuff we buy into that is just not true. You may even get upset. But won’t it be great to understand this so you can do something about it?

Imagine, in just a few minutes, you will know the 3 biggest lies that are holding your health hostage!

So let’s get to it.

The first big lie: Your genes are responsible for your health.

If you’re thinking, "Well of course that’s true," you know that even a smart person like yourself can be misled by false information. Let me explain...

Several years ago we were told that 75% of all diseases are genetically based. Now, a recent Harvard study says it’s 25%. I am sure that eventually it will be down to 3% or so. This is why...

When you look at genes and study them, you will find that they have not changed much in 40,000 years. That’s a long time. Really think about it; your genes are perfect. They respond to your environment to either produce health and healing in your body or help you survive a threat.

The question is, "Did the hunter-gatherers of 40,000 years ago develop heart disease, diabetes and cancer?" The answer is, no, no and very rarely. If the Hunter-Gatherer did not die early from trauma, they lived a long, healthy, productive life.

The Truth:
You do not get sick because of your genes. Even if your mother had cancer and your sister had cancer, it does not mean that you will have cancer. Even if your grandfather and father died of a heart attack, it does not mean that you will die of a heart attack.

Read on and you’ll discover just how powerful you really are...


The second big lie: You’re sick because you are unlucky.

I remember paging through a Physician’s Desk Reference book while I was in chiropractic school. You know, this is the book that has every disease known to man in it. The thing that was amazing is that there is very rarely a known cause of a disease. In fact, they have a fancy name for this: idiopathic. Isaac Asimov called idiopathic "A high-flow term to conceal ignorance." In the television show House, the lead character remarks that the word "comes from the Latin meaning ’we’re idiots, because we don’t know what’s causing it.’"


The Truth:
You do not get sick because you are unlucky. Just because they don’t know what caused a disease does not mean that you are unlucky.


The third big lie: Don’t worry, we are developing the magic pill.

Do you really believe that there will be a magic pill? How many years have they been looking for the cure for cancer? Did you know that the big solution they have for cancer right now is early detection?

When you look at the statistics, they are now detecting cancer around 2 years earlier than they used to. In fact, 5 year survival rate for cancer has improved dramatically. But guess what, 7 year survival rate has plummeted. So yes, they discover it earlier and treat you with chemotherapy and radiation for a longer period of time before you die, because they detected it earlier. However, people are still living generally the same amount of time.

Please understand that I know that there are a lot of cancer survivors out there that may be a little put off by these statements. Read on and you will understand that the focus of this little piece is to empower you and your upcoming generations so that they are not made victims of these lies.

The Truth:
There is no magic pill. There never will be.


So those are 3 of the biggest lies that are holding your health hostage. Did you notice what they have in common? I’m sure that you are wondering that right now. Let’s take a look at them right now.

You’re sick because of your genes.
You’re sick because you are unlucky.
Don’t worry, we’re developing a magic pill that will take care of everything.

If you were to believe these statements, then you have absolutely no power over your own health. Your health would be in someone else’s hands.

Imagine taking total control over your health. Imagine feeling awesome and never having to worry about cancer, heart disease or diabetes. Imagine achieving and maintaining your ideal weight and having an energy level that would intimidate a teenager. You are about to uncover the secret recipe to total health and longevity contained in my new bookYouth from Within. This book will will empowerment you so you can know once and for all how to be healthy and live a long, quality life. You won’t be lied to anymore!

Here is just one of the many tips that you can start to use right now. It answers the question, "What is the best way for me to eat?" So many of you have wondered this, but none have given you the answer, until now.

Remember how science has determined that your genes have not changed much in 40,000 years? One of the main keys to eating healthy is to eat like a Hunter-Gatherer ate. Did the Hunter Gatherer eat organic fruits and vegetables? Did they eat organic nuts and berries? Did they eat grass fed, free range meats? Did they eat fresh fish? What should you eat to have optimum health? Right. Just like your Hunter-Gatherer ancestor.

Flu Rant and Ways to get healthy!



My Famous Flu Rant and Ways to get healthy!

I have been hearing all this crap again about everyone must get the flu shot as a prevention from acquiring the flu... I say BS! It's nothing but the Drug companies inducing Fear! Fear into the health consumers of America. The US gov just ordered the Drug companies to make 25 million doses of the current vaccine (hmmm... why not make enough doses for the whole popluation if the Gov is soo worried about the flu.)First of all, the current vaccine was made last year and the drug companines have no ideas as to what strain is currently circulating... Secondly, the majority of individuals who take the shot, end up comming down with the flu, studies say that its do to a weaken immune system resulting from the shot and/or antibiotics... thirdly, If you have an healthy body to begin with, guess what, your body will fight what ever comes your way... Our poor diets that consist of fastfood, sugar, hydrogenated oils, car wax, radiator fluid etc lead us down that path of unhealthy distruction (Yes I did say Radiator Fluid; read your food labels)

Ways to get into health: Remedy for Preventing the Flu
Chiropractic Adjustments
Increase Sunlight Exposure
Increase Vitamin D
Avoid fast foods, sugars, soda, and Trans fats
Add fish, Omega Fatty Acids and cod liver oil to your daily diet
Fresh raw veggies
Drink plenty of Water
Exercise
Get plenty of sleep
Reduce stress levels

Thanks for Listening
Chiropracticly Yours,
Jonathan Wise D.C.

video

What's In a Flu Shot?

The flu shot is filled with very toxic chemicals: ethylene glycol (antifreeze), triton X-100 (a detergent); polysorbate 80 (a potential carcinogen); gelatin; phenol/carbolic acid (disinfectant and dye), formaldehyde (cancer-causing agent), aluminum and mercury (associated with Alzheimer's disease, cancer, brain injury and autoimmune disease), plus other chemicals and animal products in addition to three strains of virus. Do you really want this injected into your blood with access to your internal organs?

Chiropractically Yours,

Dr. Jon

Read more: http://www.myspace.com/Dr_JonWise/blog?page=3#ixzz0xutYuSOS

The Role of Chiropractic in Wellness

The Role of Chiropractic in Wellness
By Jonathan Wise D.C.


In order to grasp the concept of wellness and chiropractic, we need to understand the four basic principles of chiropractic. Principle one states: The body is a self-regulating and self-healing organism. This means that without interference, the body will always try to heal itself to homeostasis or near-normal. Principle two states: The nervous system is the master system that regulates and controls all other organs and tissues and relates the individual to their environment. The nervous system controls every thing ranging from the heart, the liver, muscles, spleen, the respiratory system, even the microscopic cells of the body. Principle three states: Spinal biomechanical dysfunction in the form of vertebral subluxation complex may adversely affect the nervous system’s ability to regulate function. Finally the fourth principle states that the central focus of the doctor of chiropractic is to optimize patient health by correcting, managing or minimizing vertebral subluxation through the chiropractic spinal adjustment. In other words, the Last two points can be summed up by this, “Subluxation is Bad, Adjusting the Subluxation is Good.”



To answer this question further, we need to be specific in the definition of a chiropractor. So, what is a chiropractor? Chiropractic is a natural healthcare science that places an emphasis on the relationship between structures of the body, predominately the spine, and function of the body that is regulated through the nervous system. Chiropractic also looks at the patient’s nutrition, exercise, and other lifestyle choices. The practice examines the combined effect of these factors on a patient’s overall health and the prevention of disease.



Chiropractors acknowledge that the body has an inborn tendency to stay well. In medicine, this concept is called “Vis Medicatrix Naturae,” meaning healing power of nature. In chiropractic, we simply call this “Innate Intelligence.” Dr. Cleveland lectures that the role of the chiropractor is to examine the patient, specifically the spine, to determine if there is proper spinal motion and position, because the issue is this, this nervous system that regulates and controls the body, it consist of the brain, the spinal cord and all the nerves that branch from the brain and spinal cord, they go to all parts of the body. They go to the heart, the liver, muscles, spleen, and the respiratory system, etc... Science tells us that this body is either directly or indirectly regulated through the nervous system. Many people think of chiropractors as bone doctors. The better interpretation is chiropractors are nerve doctors. We adjust the joints and bones to remove the interference to this nervous system, to restore its ability to express its inborn healing potential.



The Role of Chiropractic in Wellness can be best stated by taking a look at the course; Philosophy of Chiropractic I. In the Chiropractic paradigm, Dr. Cleveland III would say that there are three consciousnesses of chiropractic. There is this one consciousness in the chiropractic mindset that says: “I am the stiff neck and sore back practitioner, so send me the stiff back and sore backs.” The second consciousness says: “I see the statistics, I am good at back pain, stiff necks and headaches, but I would like to deal with those pediatrics allergy cases, the bed wetters, this disease, that disease, any disorder that result because of subluxation.” The first two are not necessary bad, they are just different. Finally, the third consciousness in chiropractic, one that Dr. Cleveland says has the highest merit says: “Yes I have seen the data. I am good with back pain, stiff neck and have seen some miraculous cases come through my clinic with the visceral disorders and so forth. But my broader goal is to address the patient’s subluxation, before it predisposes to insult the nervous system to produce physiology gone wrong” (Subluxation à Pathophysiology à Pathology). This is what we call at Cleveland Chiropractic, the practitioner who embraces the wellness concept of chiropractic.

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Acid/Alkaline Food Chart


Alkaline Foods

Vegetables
Asparagus
Artichokes
Cabbage
Lettuce
Onion
Cauliflower
Radish
Swede
Lambs Lettuce
Peas
Courgette
Red Cabbage
Leeks
Watercress
Spinach
Turnip
Chives
Carrot
Green Beans
Beetroot
Garlic
Celery
Grasses (wheat, straw, barley, dog, kamut etc.)
Cucumber
Broccoli
Kale
Brussels Sprouts

Fruits
Lemon
Lime
Avocado
Tomato
Grapefruit
Watermelon (is neutral)
Rhubarb

Drinks
'Green Drinks'
Fresh vegetable juice
Pure water (spring, distilled or ionised)
Lemon water (pure water + fresh lemon or lime).
Herbal Tea
Vegetable broth
Almond Milk

Seeds, Nuts & Grains
Almonds
Pumpkin
Sunflower
Sesame
Flax
Buckwheat Groats
Spelt
Lentils
Cumin Seeds
Any sprouted seed

Acid Foods
Meats

Pork
Lamb
Beef
Chicken
Turkey
Crustaceans
Other Seafood (apart from occasional oily fish such as salmon)

Dairy Products
Milk
Eggs
Cheese
Cream
Yogurt
Ice Cream

Others
Vinegar
White Pasta
White Bread
Wholemeal Bread
Biscuits
Soy Sauce
Tamari
Condiments (Tomato Sauce, Mayonnaise etc.)
Artificial Sweeteners
Honey

Drinks
Fizzy Drinks
Coffee
Tea
Beers
Spirits
Fruit Juice
Dairy Smoothies
Milk
Traditional Tea

Convenience Foods
Sweets
Chocolate
Microwave Meals
Tinned Foods
Powdered Soups
Instant Meals
Fast Food

Fats & Oils
Saturated Fats
Hydrogenated Oils
Margarine (worse than Butter)
Corn Oil
Vegetable Oil
Sunflower Oil

Exercise, a good diet and regular Chiropractic Care are just too Much Trouble!


I take Aspirin for the headaches caused by Zyrtec I take for the hayfever I got from Relenza for the uneasy stomach caused from the Ritalin I take for the short attention span caused by the Scopederm TS that I take for the motion sickness I got from the Lomotil I take for the diarrhea caused by the Seminal for the uncontrolled weight gain from Zocor I take for my high cholesterol because exercise, a good diet, and regular Chiropractic Care are just too much trouble!!!

Come on Guys! Make the right choices that will make your body healthy!

Thursday, August 12, 2010

THE 33 PRINCIPLES

THE 33 PRINCIPLES

1. The Major Premise - A Universal Intelligence is in all matter and continually gives to it all
its properties and actions, thus maintaining it in existence.

2. The Chiropractic Meaning of Life - The expression of this intelligence through matter is the
Chiropractic meaning of life.

3. The Union of Intelligence and Matter - Life is necessarily the union of intelligence and
matter.

4. The Triune of Life - Life is a triunity having three necessary united factors, namely:
Intelligence, Force and Matter.

5. The Perfection of the Triune - In order to have 100% Life, there must be 100% Intelligence,
100% Force, 100% Matter.

6. The Principle of Time - There is no process that does not require time.

7. The Amount of Intelligence in Matter - The amount of intelligence for any given amount of
matter is 100%, and is always proportional to its requirements.

8. The Function of Intelligence - The function of intelligence is to create force.

9. The Amount of Force Created by Intelligence - The amount of force created by intelligence is
always 100%.

10. The Function of Force - The function of force is to unite intelligence and matter.

11. The Character of Universal Forces - The forces of Universal Intelligence are manifested by
physical laws; are unswerving and unadapted, and have no solicitude for the structures in
which they work.

12. Interference with Transmission of Universal Forces - There can be interference with
transmission of universal forces.

13. The Function of Matter - The function of matter is to express force.

14. Universal Life - Force is manifested by motion in matter; all matter has motion, therefore
there is universal life in all matter.

15. No Motion without the Effort of Force - Matter can have no motion without the application of
force by intelligence.

16. Intelligence in both Organic and Inorganic Matter - Universal Intelligence gives force to
both organic and inorganic matter.

17. Cause and Effect - Every effect has a cause and every cause has effects.

18. Evidence of Life - The signs of life are evidence of the intelligence of life.

19. Organic Matter - The material of the body of a "living thing" is organized matter.

20. Innate Intelligence - A "living thing" has an inborn intelligence within its body, called
Innate Intelligence.

21. The Mission of Innate Intelligence - The mission of Innate Intelligence is to maintain the
material of the body of a "living thing" in active organization.

22. The Amount of Innate intelligence - There is 100% of Innate Intelligence in every "living
thing," the requisite amount, proportional to its organization.

23. The Function of Innate Intelligence - The function of Innate Intelligence is to adapt
universal forces and matter for use in the body, so that all parts of the body will have
co-ordinated action for mutual benefit.

24. The Limits of Adaptation - Innate Intelligence adapts forces and matter for the body as
long as it can do so without breaking a universal law, or Innate Intelligence is limited by the
limitations of matter.

25. The Character of Innate Forces - The forces of Innate Intelligence never injure or destroy the
structures in which they work.

26. Comparison of Universal and Innate Forces - In order to carry on the universal cycle of life,
Universal forces are destructive, and Innate forces constructive, as regards structural matter.

27. The Normality of Innate Intelligence - Innate Intelligence is always normal and its function
is always normal.

28. The Conductors of Innate Forces - The forces of Innate Intelligence operate through or over
the nervous system in animal bodies.

29. Interference with Transmission of Innate Forces - There can be interference with the
transmission of Innate forces.

30. The Causes of Dis-ease - Interference with the transmission of Innate forces causes
incoordination of dis-ease.

31. Subluxations - Interference with transmission in the body is always directly or indirectly
due to subluxations in the spinal column.

32. The Principle of Coordination - Coordination is the principle of harmonious action of all the
parts of an organism, in fulfilling their offices and purposes.

33. The Law of Demand and Supply - The Law of Demand and Supply is existent in the body in
its ideal state; wherein the "clearing house," is the brain, Innate the virtuous "banker," brain
cells "clerks," and nerve cells "messengers."

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Chiropractic "Effective Treatment" of Whiplash

Over the last ten years, a great deal has been written on the problem of whiplash biomechanics, but little study has been done on treatment of whiplash injuries. As the authors of a new study write, "Conventional treatment of patients with whiplash symptoms is disappointing." 1

This study examined the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment in patients with chronic whiplash pain. The mean time from injury to treatment was about 12 months. The authors began with 93 patients with chronic whiplash pain and divided them into three groups: Group I: patients with "neck pain radiating in a 'coat hanger' distribution, associated with restricted range of neck movement but with no neurological deficit." Group II: patients with "neurological symptoms, signs or both in association with neck pain and a restricted range of neck movement." Group III: patients who described "severe neck pain but all of whom has a full range of motion and no neurological symptoms or signs distributed over specific myotomes or dermatomes."

These patients also "described an unusual complex of symptoms," including "blackouts, visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting and chest pain, along with a nondermatomal distribution of pain." The patients underwent chiropractic treatment for 4.1 months, with a mean of 19.3 treatments per patient. The patients were graded before and after treatment on a four-point scale that described their symptoms: Grade A was the absence of symptoms. Grade B patients had symptoms described as a nuisance. Grade C patients had symptoms that were intrusive. Grade D patients had symptoms considered disabling.

The authors found that in Group I, 72% of the patients improved; in Group II, 94%; and in Group III, only 27% of the patients reported improvement. So, there seem to be certain factors that can increase or decrease the effectiveness of chiropractic with these patients.

The study discusses the ramifications of the findings: "Woodward et al2 found improvement in chronic symptoms in 26 of 28 patients (93%) following chiropractic treatment. Our results confirm the efficacy of chiropractic, with 69 of our 93 patients (74%) improving following treatment. "Our study suggests that such a group of nonresponders does exist, represented by group 3.

The defining characteristics of patients in this group were the full range of neck movement in association with neck pain, bizarre symptoms, female sex and ongoing litigation. The mean age of the group at 29.5 (16-43) was lower than that of the other two groups (mean 36.8, range 18-65). "The results from this study provide further evidence that chiropractic is an effective treatment for chronic whiplash symptoms.

However, our identification of a group of patients who fail to respond to such treatment, highlights the need for a careful history and physical examination before commencing treatment."

The authors conclude: "Whiplash injuries are common. Chiropractic is the only proven effective treatment in chronic cases."

1.Khan S, Cook J, Gargan M, Bannister G. A symptomatic classification of whiplash injury and the implications for treatment. Journal of Orthopaedic Medicine 1999;21(1):22-25.

2.Woodward MN, Cook JCH, Gargan MF, Bannister GC. Chiropractic treatment of chronic whiplash injuries. Injury 1996;27:643-645.
video

Beyond Weight Loss: The Unexpected Benefits of hCG

Beyond Weight Loss: The Unexpected Benefits of hCG
Marion GoldsmithJanuary 18, 2008HCG is quickly gaining recognition for its ability to help with weight loss. Although the hormone still has not been approved by the FDA for use as a weight loss product, many physicians are recommending it to their patients and weight loss clinics specializing in HCG weight loss treatments are becoming more common. In addition to helping people lose weight, however, many people utilizing this weight loss program are discovering that there are additional benefits as well.

The Body Sculpting Benefits of HCG Treatments

Many of the people that are using HCG to help them lose weight are finding that the hormone helps with the reshaping of their body´s as well. Unlike many weight loss programs that only help with losing weight, HCG appears to help contour the body and decrease the circumference of the body. HCG also helps tone common problem areas, such as reducing the amount of fat deposited in double chins and getting rid of pot bellies. HCG also appears to help rejuvenate structural fat, which helps make the hands, neck, and face look refreshed.

Individuals on the HCG diet are also supposed to follow a low calorie diet of only 500 calories per day. Without the help of HCG, a diet consisting of this few calories can results in a loss of muscle mass. Those on HCG, however, do not experience this side effect. In addition, the hormone appears to actually reduce the appetite, which makes it easier to adhere to the 500 calorie diet.

The Health Benefits of the HCG Diet

Obviously, shedding extra pounds will help improve the overall health of a person on the HCG diet. Researchers also believe that taking HCG helps to normalize the cholesterol levels of those on the diet. In addition, the hormone appears to help normalize the thyroid gland and balance the hormones while rebuilding the adrenaline glands.


The Emotional Benefits of the HCG Diet

People on the HCG diet also routinely report experiencing less irritability and generally feeling in a better mood. This lift in spirits seems to continue throughout the entire treatment period. Patients also report having more restful sleep, which may be partially responsible for the improved mood. Similarly, patients report feeling more energized while undergoing the therapy. This may be attributed to the improvement in sleep, the loss of excess weight, and the positive impact HCG has on the adrenaline glands.

For many, just the weight loss benefits of HCG would be enough to make this hormone worth taking. With the additional benefits that the hormone appears to have, however, it makes the HCG weight loss program that anyone looking to lose weight should consider.

Antioxidants for a Youthful Appearance

Antioxidants for a Youthful Appearance

Those who continue to look young in their 50s, 60s, 70s , and beyond usually have learned many secrets and strategies for keeping themselves healthy and well. For the most part, those secrets are not found in the bottles, tubes, and jars whose sales account for many billions of dollars each year.

One key secret is eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. No one needed to be reminded of this 75 years ago. In those days produce was an essential dietary component. And for the most part the produce people age was grown locally. Today we have so many choices, not all of them healthful, and we need to be sure to eat produce that is fresh rather than packaged in cans.

Colorful fresh produce contains high levels of antioxidants, those small biochemicals that pack a big punch. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals, naturally occurring end-products of metabolism that destroy cells and may even cause cancer if they're not removed promptly.

In fact, a recent article in Ecology Letters pointed to an even more remarkable power of antioxidants. Researchers were studying brightly colored plumage on birds (which signal their efficacy as mates). Their work confirmed that more colorful males are better able to protect their sperm from oxidative stress. The article reported that sperm quality in less colorful males improved when antioxidants (specifically, carotenoids) were added to their diet.

In short, antioxidants provided by fresh produce have all kinds of life-extending benefits!

Being Young, Feeling Young, Looking Young

Poets throughout the centuries have helped us see that being young is a state of mind. That special state of mind impels us to take actions on our own behalf, actions that have specific consequences for our health and well-being.

But so many people believe in the power of the dollar. They spend vast sums every year on anti-aging, beauty, and cosmetic products in the false hope of being able to purchase remedies that will restore their fading youth.

Others hasten the loss of their youthful glow. Cigarettes, alcohol, and negative mental constructs such as resentment, jealousy, and anger all work to rapidly break down our health and vigor. Negative emotions are especially insidious. Even if a person is healthy in other respects - eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly - stress, fear, anguish, and ill-will relentlessly add invisible workloads to the day, sapping our strength and aging us prematurely.

People who look and feel ten years younger than the age revealed on their birth certificates have learned how to create a positive mental attitude. It's amazing how much bounce you can add to your step when you intentionally set about having a great day. Of course, this is not merely smoke and mirrors. Those who are intending to be young inside and outside take the necessary steps. They don't eat doughnuts (except on their free food days). They rarely consume fast food. They do eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. They do exercise regularly, some even doing some form of vigorous physical activity five or six times each week.1,2,3

These young-at-heart people get sufficient rest. They are willing to give up the attitudes, positions, and annoyances that do not serve their well-being. And many of them have discovered a natural healing method and philosophy that helps them to be well and stay well - chiropractic care.

Chiropractic is a smart, efficient form of health care. Chiropractic care helps remove physiologic obstacles to good health and helps your body learn how to maintain high levels of functioning. After beginning chiropractic care many people comment that they feel as if they've let go of a big weight they didn't know they'd been carrying around. People say they feel lighter and they have more energy. They sleep better. They even feel as if they're taller.

Others comment that they've become more effective at work and in their personal lives. As a result of chiropractic care their bodies are expending much less energy in wasteful and unnecessary physiologic activities. The result is more available resources to do - efficiently and well - what is necessary each day out in the world.

One wonderful outcome is the ongoing recovery of the youthful appearance and outlook we always want to maintain.

Thursday, August 5, 2010

HCG VEGETABLE RECIPES

VEGETABLE RECIPES

Cabbage Rice/Noodle Alternative
½ - 1 head of cabbage finely chopped into rice sized or noodle size pieces
Your choice of spices
1 cup chicken, vegetable broth or water
* Mexican rice style
1 cup chicken or vegetable broth
2 tablespoons minced onion
1 clove of garlic crushed and minced
¼ teaspoon Mexican oregano
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste
Dash of cumin to taste
Fresh chopped cilantro
Salt and pepper to taste

* Italian style
1 cup chicken or vegetable broth
¼ teaspoon fresh or dried oregano
¼ teaspoon dried basil or 5 leaves fresh basil rolled and sliced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Salt and pepper to taste

* Indian style
½ teaspoon curry
2 tablespoons minced onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
¼ teaspoon cumin
Salt and pepper to taste

* Oriental style
½ teaspoon ginger
3 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 tablespoons orange juice (optional)
2 tablespoons chopped onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced

In a large frying pan sauté cabbage with a little water (vegetable or chicken
broth may be substituted) and liquid ingredients. Add spices and cook until
cabbage is tender adding water as necessary. Add ground beef or chicken to the spiced cabbage if desired.
Makes 2 or more servings (1 vegetable)

Garlic and Onion Spiced Chard
4-6 cups swiss or red chard
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
½ cup vegetable, chicken broth or water
4 tablespoons lemon juice to taste
6 cloves of garlic chopped
2 tablespoons chopped onion
½ teaspoon garlic powder
Salt and pepper to taste
In a frying pan add chard, water, onion, garlic and spices to the water and
liquid ingredients and sauté for 5 minutes or to desired level of doneness.
Sprinkle with lemon and salt and pepper to taste.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)

Cold Chicory Salad
Chopped fresh chicory
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Bragg’s liquid aminos
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste
Chop chicory very fine. Stir in apple cider vinegar and lemon juice. Add
salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Enjoy as a side dish or cool
salad. Phase 2 variations: Add tomatoes and chopped fresh mint or mix in a little orange juice. Add finely minced red onion and garlic or chopped apple and stevia.
Makes 1 serving (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a little olive, walnut, or hazelnut oil. Sprinkle
with 1 tablespoon chopped walnuts and feta cheese.

Caramelized Onion Garnish
½ large onion cut into fine rings
4 tablespoons lemon juice
Vanilla stevia to taste
Small amount of water as needed
Pinch of salt
Preheat skillet. Add small amount of water to bottom of pan and add lemon
juice and stevia. Add onion rings and stevia and cook quickly periodically
deglazing the pan with a little more water to create a sweet caramel sauce.
Serve immediately over steak or chicken. Spoon any remaining sauce
created by deglazing over the top. Can be served chilled and added as a
topping to salads.
Makes 4 servings

Savory Baked Red Onion Garnish
½ red onion cut into rings
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 bay leaf or pinch of bay leaf powder
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Pinch of dried basil and oregano (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste
Small amount of water
Put onion in a baking dish with apple cider vinegar, water, and spices. Bake
at 375 for 10 minutes. Serve hot over beef or chicken or chill and add to
salads. Can also be sautéed in a small frying pan deglazing periodically.
Phase 2 variations: substitute a sprinkle of rosemary, tarragon or dill instead of other spices. Or sprinkle with organic poultry seasoning.
Makes 4 servings
Phase 3 modifications: Brush with olive oil before baking or sauté with
browned butter and spices. Top with fresh grated parmesan or Romano
cheese. Try baked, topped with a slice of provolone or mozzarella cheese.

Garlic Spinach
Spinach
½ cup chicken broth or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced onion
2 cloves garlic crushed and minced
¼ teaspoon onion powder
Pinch red pepper flakes
Sauté the onion and garlic lightly in frying pan with a little water and lemon
juice until soft. Add fresh garlic and spices. Stir in fresh spinach leaves and
cook lightly. Serve with your favorite chicken or fish dish.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)

Saffron Cabbage
Chopped cabbage (½ head)
1 cup chicken broth or water
2 tablespoons onion finely chopped
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Pinch of saffron powder or threads softened in water and made into a paste.
1/8 teaspoon turmeric
Dash of mustard powder
Salt and pepper to taste
In a large frying pan, heat chicken broth and spices. Add cabbage and cover pan with a lid. Cook cabbage until tender adding water if necessary to keep from burning and coating with the spice mixture. Serve hot with chicken or chilled for a cool salad.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)

Radish Relish
6-7 large red radishes
3 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste (optional)
Combine liquid ingredients with powdered spices. Finely dice radishes and
marinate in liquid mixture for 1-3 hours or overnight. Use as a topping on
your protein servings or as a side dish.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)

Indian Spiced Spinach
Spinach
2 tablespoons minced onion
¼ cup chicken broth or water
1/8 teaspoon cumin
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/8 teaspoon turmeric
Pinch of fresh grated ginger
Pinch of ground coriander
Salt and pepper to taste
Sauté spices in chicken broth with onion. Add spinach and stir gently until
cooked. (substitute ¼ teaspoon garam masala for dry spices) Variations: add chicken or shrimp.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add melted butter or ghee. Stir in chunks of paneer
cheese to make palak paneer, a traditional Indian dish.

Baked Celery
Celery
½ cup beef, chicken broth, or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
2 tablespoons chopped onions
1 clove fresh chopped garlic
1 bay leaf
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Paprika to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Chop up celery into sticks and arrange in a baking dish. Dissolve spices in
liquid ingredients and pour over the celery. Bake in 375 degree oven in until
soft and lightly brown on top. Serve with the juices and sprinkle with
paprika. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Makes 1-2 servings (1 vegetable)

Chilled Tomato Salad
Chopped tomatoes
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon green onion sliced
1 garlic clove crushed and minced
Dash of mustard powder
¼ teaspoon basil
1/8 teaspoon thyme
1/8 teaspoon marjoram
Salt and pepper to taste
Combine apple cider vinegar with spices. Pour over tomato chunks or
slices. Marinate and chill for 1 hour before serving.
Makes 2 servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add olive oil or mayonnaise, mix in small slices of
Swiss or crumbled feta cheese and sliced green olives.

Grilled Asparagus with Rosemary Lemon Sauce
Asparagus
Juice of ½ lemon with rind
1 tablespoon Bragg’s liquid aminos
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
¼ teaspoon rosemary
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Cayenne pepper to taste
Marinate asparagus in lemon, garlic, salt, cayenne pepper and Braggs.
Steam or grill asparagus spears to desired level of doneness. In a small
saucepan place remaining lemon marinade along with lemon rind, ½ cup
water, spices and cook until pulp starts to come out. You may add a little
stevia if you wish for added sweetness. Reduce liquid by half. Remove
lemon rind and pour over grilled asparagus. Garnish with lemon wedges and salt and pepper to taste.
Makes 1 serving (1 vegetable)

Pickled Beet Greens
Beet greens
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon Bragg’s amino acids
1 clove garlic crushed and sliced
2 tablespoons minced onion
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes or to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste (optional)
Combine liquid ingredients and spices. Pour over beet greens and cook for
5-10 minutes stirring occasionally to mix spices. Add water as necessary.
Serve hot or cold.
Makes 1 or more servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add 2 tablespoons of crumbled bacon to the greens
for added flavor.

Roasted Fruit and Vegetable Kabobs
1 apple cut into large chunks
¼ onion cut into 1 inch petals
1 tomato cut into chunks
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ teaspoon crushed mint leaves
½ teaspoon crushed cilantro leaves
Pinch of allspice
Stevia to taste
Marinate fruit and vegetables in lemon juice and vinegar with stevia and
spices in the refrigerator for 20 minutes or more. Soak wooden skewers in
water for five minutes. Layer chopped apple, onion petals, and tomato
alternately on to skewers.
Place on grill for 5-8 minutes or until desired level of doneness. Top with
herbs and serve with lemon wedges.
Makes 1 serving (1 fruit, 1 vegetable)

Hot Pickled Red Cabbage
Red cabbage
1 apple diced
½ cup apple cider vinegar
¼ cup water
2 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
2 tablespoons chopped red onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
A pinch of red pepper flakes
Salt and pepper to taste
Slow cook cabbage and apples in water, apple cider vinegar. Add spices and chopped onion, and garlic, and stevia. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot or cold.
Makes 2 serving (1 vegetable, 1 fruit)

Hot Peppered Chicory
Chicory
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
Mince the chicory. In a small saucepan add chicory to broth and add lemon
juice, salt and pepper. Cook for 3-5 minutes and serve hot.
Makes 1 or more servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a little butter or olive oil or omit the lemon
juice and add a small amount of half and half or cream cheese. Top with
grated parmesan cheese or mix in crumbled feta cheese.
Fennel with Herbs
Fennel bulbs
½ cup vegetable broth or water.
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Your choice of marinade or dressing
Thoroughly wash and trim fresh fennel. Cook the fennel for several minutes
in a little water or vegetable broth adding pepper, lemon, salt and fresh or
dried herbs. Try Italian style or toss with Spicy Cajun or Dill Dressing.
Cook until the bulb portion is tender and delicious. Fennel may also be
grilled on the barbeque.
Makes 1 or more servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Drizzle with melted butter or olive oil. Fennel has a
slight licorice taste and goes well with fish.

Herbed Asparagus
Generous serving of Asparagus
½ cup vegetable, chicken broth, or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 clove of garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 teaspoon organic Italian herb mix
Water as needed
Lightly sauté chopped onion, garlic and herbs in the chicken broth for about
one minute. Add the asparagus and cook until tender. Top with herbed
sauce (add a little powdered garlic and onion for a thicker sauce). Garnish
with parsley and lemon wedges.
Makes 1 or more servings (1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a splash of white wine. Stir in cold cubes of
butter whisking gently to create a butter sauce or omit the lemon juice and
stir in ¼ cup cream or half and half. Add a few capers and top with fresh
herbs.

Roasted Tomato with Onion
4 thin whole slices of onion
4 thick cut tomato slices
1-2 cloves of garlic sliced
2 leaves fresh basil rolled and sliced
Sprinkle of dried or fresh oregano
Salt and black pepper to taste
Stevia to taste (optional)
Squeeze of lemon juice
Lay out slices of onion rings intact. Salt and pepper the onion and sprinkle
with lemon juice. Lay a few slices of basil and garlic on top of the onion.
Top onion slices with a slice of tomato. Top the tomato with remaining basil
and garlic. Bake at 375 for 10-15 minutes or until desired level of doneness.
Sprinkle with lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.
Makes 4 servings (1 vegetable)

Spiced Beet Greens
Beet greens
¼ cup chicken broth or water
4 tablespoons lemon juice
2 cloves of garlic crushed and minced
¼ teaspoon paprika
Pinch of cumin
Pinch of lemon zest
Salt and pepper to taste
Combine spices in liquid ingredients. Lightly sauté beet greens in spice
mixture. Serve hot and garnish with lemon and fresh ground black pepper.
Phase 3 modifications: Top with 1 tablespoon of crushed pecans.

Chilled Pesto Tomato Salad
2 medium tomatoes or 3 Roma tomatoes sliced.
3 leaves of fresh basil rolled and sliced
Savory red onion or caramelized onion garnish
1-2 cloves of garlic minced
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons caper juice
1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
Toss fresh tomatoes with spices and vinegar and coat completely. Marinate
for at least 1 hour. Top with onion garnish and serve.
1-2 servings (1 vegetable or fruit)
Phase 3 modifications: Layer sliced tomatoes with fresh mozzarella cheese
to make a Caprese salad. Brush with olive oil.

HCG SEAFOOD ENTREES

SEAFOOD ENTREES

Curried Shrimp with Tomatoes
100 grams shrimp
½ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tomatoes chopped
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1/8 teaspoon curry or to taste
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
Pinch of allspice
Stevia to taste
Sauté the shrimp with the onion and garlic for about 3 minutes or until
cooked. Add vegetable broth, curry and stevia. Add garlic and onion
powder to thicken the mixture. Cook for 5-10 minutes on medium heat.
Add water or reduce liquid until desired consistency is reached.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)

Shrimp Etouffee
100 grams shrimp
½ cup vegetable broth or water
Celery
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon chopped red onion
1 tablespoon chopped green onion
Pinch of thyme
Pinch of cayenne pepper to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Add spices and vegetables to broth and simmer for about 15 minutes until
celery is softened. Add the shrimp to the mixture and cook an additional
10-20 minutes. Serve hot.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Start sauce with browned butter. Add a splash of
dry sherry to the sauce and whisk in additional cold chunks of butter to
create a richer more flavorful sauce.

Tilapia with Herbs
100 grams of Tilapia fish
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon chopped onion
Pinch of dill
Fresh parsley
Salt and black pepper to taste
Sauté fish in lemon juice with a little water then add onion, garlic and fresh
herbs. Garnish with chopped parsley. Or bake in baking dish with a little
water at 350 for 20 minutes until fish is tender and delicious. Variations:
oregano, thyme, or tarragon.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Baked Curried Fish
Your choice of white fish
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 serving Melba toast crumbs
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon curry powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Fresh parsley
Combine dry spices and Melba toast crumbs. Dip fish into Melba and spice
mixture to coat thoroughly. Broil fish until fish is cooked and herbed crumb
mixture is slightly brown. Garnish with lemon slices and fresh parsley.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)

Poached Halibut
100 grams per serving halibut
½ cup vegetable broth or water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon chopped onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
½ teaspoon fresh ginger
Pinch of grated orange zest
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste
Heat up the vegetable broth in small frying pan. Add lemon juice, onion,
garlic, and spices. Poach halibut filet for 5-10 minutes until fish is tender
and cooked thoroughly. May also be wrapped in foil and placed on the
barbeque. Serve topped with remaining juices as a sauce.
Makes one serving (1 protein)

Creole Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
½ cup vegetable broth or water
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon minced onion
¼ teaspoon horseradish
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1-2 teaspoons hot sauce
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Pinch of thyme
1 bay leaf
Dash of sassafras powder or root beer flavored stevia
Dash of liquid smoke flavoring (optional)
Cayenne pepper to taste
Salt and black pepper to taste
Mix liquid ingredients, onion, garlic, and spices. Simmer over low heat for
10 minutes in a small frying pan. Add shrimp and cook thoroughly for an
additional 5 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Deglaze the pan
periodically with additional water or broth. Serve hot or cold over a salad or
with fresh asparagus.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Shrimp Scampi
100 grams shrimp
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
3 tablespoons lemon juice
4 cloves garlic crushed and minced
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Dash of chili or cayenne pepper powder to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Add garlic to liquid ingredients. Add shrimp and additional spices. Cook
for 5-7 minutes until shrimp are pink and liquid is reduced. Serve hot or
cold with a salad or on a bed of spinach.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Sweet Ginger Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons orange juice (optional)
2 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
¼ teaspoon fresh or powdered ginger
Pinch of chili powder
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Stevia to taste
Salt and black pepper to taste
Mix dry spices with vegetable broth and liquid ingredients. Sauté with
shrimp in small saucepan stirring continuously until cooked. Add water to
deglaze the pan periodically until desired consistency is reached.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Jambalaya
100 grams shrimp (chicken, beef, or chicken sausage can be used)
Tomatoes or celery chopped
1 cup vegetable broth or water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon chopped onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Dash of Worcestershire sauce
Dash of hot sauce
Dash of liquid smoke (optional)
Pinch of cayenne to taste
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
Pinch of thyme
Salt and pepper
Water as needed
Lightly sauté shrimp or chicken with celery or tomatoes, garlic and onion in
lemon juice until cooked or lightly browned. Deglaze the pan with broth
and add seasonings. Simmer on low for approximately 20-30 minutes until
liquid is slightly reduced adding additional broth or water to achieve desired
consistency.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable, 1 fruit)
Phase 3 modifications: Add chopped red and green bell pepper and
additional seafood, chicken, sausage, etc.

Black Pepper Sautéed Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
1 serving Melba toast crumbs (optional)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon caper juice
Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
Mix Melba toast crumbs with salt and generous amount of black pepper.
Coat shrimp with Melba toast pepper mixture and fry on high heat in a
skillet in a little lemon juice until cooked well. Serve hot and garnish with
lemon and additional freshly ground black pepper.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)

Ginger Shrimp Wraps
100 grams shrimp
1 or more cabbage or lettuce leaves
1 cup vegetable broth or water
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Bragg’s liquid aminos
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Pinch of fresh ginger
1 tablespoon finely minced green onion
1 serving spicy orange sauce (optional, for dipping page 56)
Salt and pepper to taste
Lightly steam cabbage leaves and then set aside. Cook shrimp with spices
and mince together with onion. Wrap up shrimp mixture in cabbage or
lettuce leaves and enjoy with dipping sauce. Another alternative is to place
multiple rolls in small baking dish. Cover with vegetable broth and bake for
25 minutes at 350 degrees. Variations: Dip wraps in Sweet wasabi dipping
sauce (page 54) or top with additional Bragg’s.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a drizzle of sesame, peanut or hot chili oil to the shrimp mixture for added flavor.

Crab Cakes
100 grams snow or king crab meat
1 serving Melba toast crumbs
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon finely minced onion
1 clove crushed and minced garlic
Cayenne to taste
Salt and black pepper to taste
In a small bowl combine ingredients and form into cakes. Press crab cakes
into muffin tins and bake at 350 degrees for about 10-20 minutes until
slightly brown on top. The crab mixture can also be sauté d until warm or
chilled and served over a green salad with lemon garnish and topped with
Melba toast crumbs.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a little egg to the crab mixture and fry with a
little butter or oil. Serve with Cajun spiced cream sauce or mayonnaise.

Cajun Baked Fish
100 grams your choice of white fish
1 serving Melba toast crumbs
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
Pinch of cayenne pepper to taste
Pinch of thyme
Salt and black pepper to taste
Combine spices and Melba toast powder. Dip fish in lemon juice and coat
with spice mixture. Bake in 350 degree oven for 20 minutes or broil until
lightly brown. Garnish with parsley.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)
Phase 3 modifications: Dip fish in egg and brush with olive oil. Serve with
a Cajun cream sauce.

Lemon Dill Fish
100 grams any kind of white fish
4 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon fresh dill
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon minced onion
Salt and black pepper to taste
Sauté fish with lemon juice, vegetable broth, and vinegar. Add garlic, onion,
and fresh dill. Cook for an additional 5-10 minutes or until fish is
completely cooked. Garnish with lemon wedges.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Italian Shrimp with Tomatoes
100 grams shrimp
2 large tomatoes chopped
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ teaspoon dried or fresh basil
2 cloves of garlic crushed and minced
Pinch of dried or fresh oregano
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Salt and black pepper to taste
Sauté onion, garlic and spices in broth and lemon juice. Add spices and
cook for 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and tomatoes and cook until shrimp is
pink and well cooked
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Sauté with a little olive oil. Add chopped zucchini
or other vegetables. Top with fresh grated parmesan cheese.

Sweet Wasabi Sautéed Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
1 recipe sweet wasabi marinade
1 tablespoon minced onion
Pinch of dried or fresh ginger
Stevia to taste
Sauté shrimp with onion in wasabi marinade. Serve hot or enjoy chilled
over mixed green salad.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Spicy Mustard Shrimp with Chard
100 grams shrimp
Chard chopped
½ cup vegetable broth or water
3 tablespoons homemade mustard
2 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Pinch of red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons chopped onion
2 cloves garlic sliced
Salt and pepper to taste
Sauté the shrimp with onion, garlic, Bragg’s, vinegar, lemon juice and
mustard until cooked. Remove the shrimp and deglaze the pan with the
vegetable broth. Add chard to the broth and cook stirring occasionally until
chard is tender. Add a little water if needed. Top with mustard shrimp and
enjoy.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Cook with a little olive oil, sesame oil or walnut oil.
Top with 2 tablespoons chopped roasted almonds.

Baked White Fish with Asparagus
100 grams white fish (make multiple servings for best results)
Asparagus
1 serving Melba toast crumbs per serving
½ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tablespoons caper juice
4 tablespoons lemon juice
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon onion minced
¼ teaspoon dried or fresh dill
Pinch of tarragon
Parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
In a small baking dish, layer the fish and asparagus. Mix vegetable broth
with spices and pour over fish and asparagus. Top with herbed Melba toast
crumbs and bake at 350 for about 20 minutes or until fish and asparagus is
cooked thoroughly and crumbs are slightly brown. Top with remaining
sauce, fresh parsley, and serve with lemon wedges. Dish can also be cooked on the barbeque. Just wrap up fish and asparagus in foil, toss with spices and baste with vegetable broth.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable, 1 Melba toast)

Orange or Lemon Glazed Orange Roughy BBQ Wrap
100 grams orange roughy fish
3 orange slices
3 tablespoons orange juice (optional)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon chopped green onion
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste
Place fish on aluminum foil. Baste with juice and spices. Top with orange
or lemon slices. Wrap up and place on barbeque or in the stove at 350
degrees for 10-15 minutes until well cooked and fork tender. Serve with
juices and orange slices. Sprinkle with parsley.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 fruit)

Poached Fish with Thyme
Any white fish
½ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tablespoons caper juice
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon minced red onion
Pinch of thyme
Salt and pepper to taste
Add garlic, onion and spices to liquid ingredients. Add fish and poach for 5
minutes or until fish is cooked thoroughly. Garnish with parsley and lemon.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)
Phase 3 modifications: Brush fish with melted butter or olive oil. Top with
a tablespoon of capers.

Sweet Orange Pepper Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 serving of sweet orange marinade (page 54)
Stevia to taste
Marinate shrimp for 30 minutes in marinade. In small frying pan add shrimp
and rest of marinade along with a few chopped slices of orange. Add black
pepper to taste. Deglaze the pan periodically with water, Sauté until shrimp
are cooked and tender and the sauce is the right consistency.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 fruit)

Lobster Medallions in Tomato Sauce
100 grams raw lobster tail
2 tomatoes chopped
8 ounces tomato sauce
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 clove of garlic crushed and minced
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 bay leaf
1/8 teaspoon thyme
1/8 teaspoon fresh chopped tarragon
Cayenne pepper to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Chopped parsley
Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
Slice medallions of lobster tail. Weigh out 100 grams raw. Sauté lobster in
lemon juice and a little water then add garlic, onion, tomatoes, tomato sauce, and spices. Simmer for 10-15 minutes and serve.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a drizzle of olive oil or add small cubes of cold
unsalted butter and stir in quickly for a richer sauce. Add a splash of white
wine or dry sherry and a tablespoon of heavy cream.

Baked Stuffed Lobster
100 grams raw lobster tail
1 serving Melba toast crumbs
½ cup vegetable broth or water
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
Paprika to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix Melba toast crumbs with spices, garlic and onion. Stuff lobster tail with
Melba mixture and place into baking dish stuffing side up. Pour vegetable
broth over the lobster, dust the lobster with more paprika and bake at 350
degrees for approximately 20 minutes. Broil for additional 1-2 minutes to
brown. Add salt and pepper to taste and serve with lemon wedges.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)
Phase 3 modifications: Add parmesan cheese to the stuffing and serve with
melted butter.

Savory Onion Caramelized Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
Sliced onion cut into rings
¼ cup water
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
Vanilla flavored liquid stevia to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Heat up the liquid ingredients on high heat in small frying pan. Add stevia,
salt, pepper, onion, and shrimp. Deglaze with a little water several times to
create a caramelized sauce.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)

Sweet and Sour Shrimp
100 grams shrimp
1 cup water
½ lemon with rind
½ orange with rind
3 tablespoons Bragg’s liquid aminos
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Cayenne to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste
Boil 1 cup of water with ½ lemon and ½ orange with rind until pulp comes
out of the center. Scrape out remaining pulp and discard the rind. Add
onion, garlic, Bragg’s, and spices and reduce liquid by half. Add the shrimp
to the sauce and sauté for 5-7 minutes until shrimp is cooked.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 fruit)
Phase 3 modifications: Add red and green bell peppers to the mix. Add
sesame or chili oil to the recipe and a small amount of fresh pineapple.
(Pineapple should be used sparingly due to the high sugar content)

Shrimp with Mint and Cilantro
100 grams shrimp
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro finely minced
1 tablespoon fresh mint finely minced
1 teaspoon fresh Italian parsley
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia (optional)
In a small frying pan, fry up the garlic in the lemon juice. Add shrimp,
cilantro, mint and parsley. Stir fry together until shrimp is cooked and
coated with herb mixture. Add a little extra water or lemon juice if
necessary. Garnish lemon wedges.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)
Phase 3 modifications: Add a little olive oil, parmesan cheese and top with
walnuts or pine nuts.

Orange Roughy with Tomatoes and Onion
100 grams orange roughy fish
2 tomatoes chopped
2 tablespoons onion chopped
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
½ cup vegetable broth or water
Salt and pepper to taste
Sauté onions and garlic in vegetable broth, add orange roughy and spices
until almost cooked about 5 minutes. Add freshly chopped tomatoes and
cook for an additional 5 minutes. Serve hot, add salt and pepper to taste.
Garnish with parsley.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 vegetable)
Phase 3 modifications: Sauté onions and garlic in butter. Add ¼ cup half
and half.

Sautéed Snapper with Lemon Pepper Sauce
100 grams red snapper
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons caper juice
Dash of garlic powder
Dash of onion powder
Dash of cayenne (optional)
Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Add dry spices to broth and liquid ingredients. Sauté fish in sauce for 5-10
minutes until thoroughly cooked.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)
Phase 3 modifications: Whisk in small cubes of unsalted butter to create a
lemon butter sauce.

Blackened Red Snapper
100 grams red snapper fish
Blackening spice mix
2 teaspoons paprika
4 teaspoons thyme
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 teaspoons oregano
½ teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon nutmeg powder
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
Stevia
Mix spices well in shaker jar. On a paper plate remove enough of the spice
mixture to coat pieces of fish thoroughly. Preheat a skillet to high heat. Add
fish dry and cook quickly until spices are blackened and fish is cooked
completely. Serve hot. Garnish with lemon and fresh parsley. Save the rest
of the blackened spice mixture to use later. Works well with chicken also.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein)

Baked Lobster with Spicy Lemon Sauce
100 grams sliced lobster tail
1 serving Melba toast crumbs
¼ cup water
4 tablespoons lemon juice
Pinch of red pepper flakes
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
Pinch of sweet paprika
Pinch of lemon zest
1 teaspoon fresh chopped parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
In a small saucepan combine water and lemon juice with spices and bring to a boil. Reduce liquid and deglaze occasionally. Lay out slices of lobster in small baking dish. Pour lemon sauce over lobster and sprinkle with Melba crumbs, paprika, salt and fresh ground pepper. Bake lobster slices at 350 degrees for approximately 15 minutes or until lobster is fully cooked. Add a little extra water if needed so lobster doesn’t burn. Serve hot and topped with sauce. Garnish with lemon slices and sprinkle with lemon zest and
parsley.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 Melba toast)

Citrus Fish
100 grams white fish
1 tablespoon minced onion
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Lemon and orange zest to taste
Lemon and orange slices
Chopped parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
Stevia to taste
Mix lemon juice with zest and a little stevia. Baste fish with mixture and top
with salt, pepper, and lemon and orange slices. Wrap in aluminum foil and
place on the barbeque or in oven at 350 degrees. Cook fish for 5-10 minutes or until fish is thoroughly cooked. Serve with lemon and top with parsley.
Makes one serving (1 protein, 1 fruit)

Mahi Mahi with Oranges
100 grams mahi mahi fish
½ orange in segments
2 tablespoons Bragg’s amino acids
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
1/8 teaspoon fresh or dried ginger
1 tablespoon chopped green onion
1 clove garlic crushed and minced
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Stevia to taste
Cayenne to taste
A little water as needed
Sauté mahi mahi fish with a little water, vinegar and Bragg’s then add garlic, spices, and stevia. Add ½ orange in chunks or segments. Cook for 5-10 minutes. Top with green onion and serve on a bed of steamed spinach or greens.
Makes 1 serving (1 protein, 1 fruit)