Friday, January 22, 2016

Baby Crawling: How Important It Really Is

There is nobody in the world as busy as a one-year-old baby, possibly the most productive year of his entire life. So numerous and so different are all his experiences; he goes up and down and touches, smells, feels, and tastes almost everything that comes into his grasp.

His brain needs to put some order to the myriad of experiences he is coming in contact with; it needs to “file” and organize the areas where culture, beliefs, ideas, and knowledge will be stored along all the life of this being.

The baby is too busy: without his knowledge he is growing and his nervous system is maturing. He accomplishes this by performing many activities, including resting to replenish his strength, doing happy but unarticulated movement of his hands, and kicking the air with his little legs.

As time passes, he is able to hold his head and observe the world that surrounds him with a more horizontal and vertical point of view. After accomplishing this task, he will no longer be satisfied by just lying down—he will enrich his world by remaining upright, gaining perspective and depth of spaces and objects.

This tri-dimensional world floods his brain with stimuli that have to be reorganized, learning and re-learning all the time. Consciously he does not know what he is seeing or touching but this miraculous organism will store it and file it anyway.

He is so fascinated with all that surrounds him, he is not aware that his spinal column is strengthening. Around six months of age, he is able to sit by himself and gain strength and liberty for his arms, giving him more options in movement and activities to enrich his world.

The joy of playing—throwing and reaching for objects and toys which are farther and farther away from him makes him crave for more and this is how he first discovers “rolling” and then finally, starts to crawl.

Crawling not only means a new way of locomotion: as he moves from one side to the other, a lot of very exciting things are happening inside his little head. More and more studies show that crawling has a paramount connection between the physical and neurological development of the baby which, in the future, will be of major importance in his academic and extra-academic performance. Crawling allows babies to create connections between both cerebral hemispheres. When the baby coordinates his movements to move in one direction, he mostly first moves the right arm and the left leg and then the left arm with the right leg in a reciprocating motion; this is called cross-crawl patterning.

Motor nerve impulses to the extremities originate in each side of the brain cortex and cross in the brain stem in an area called the corpus callosum to supply required motor activity to the opposite extremity. This means that when the baby crawls, both hemispheres must communicate and interchange information very fast.

What makes this incredible is that these same patterns, or neurological routes, are the same that later in life will be use to perform more difficult tasks, such as walking, running, passing one object from one hand to the other, or even taking notes in a class while listening to the teacher.

The body of the baby must remain in equilibrium and advance in an orderly and organized fashion. The axis that it is formed between the joints of the hips and shoulders should rotate opposite to each other while the baby crawls and cause torsion in the baby’s spine. This torsion will tonify and model the structures of the spinal column, preparing them for an erect posture when the baby starts to walk. The curvatures of the spine, especially the ones at the neck and lower back area, will start to form, setting the basis for the correct spinal model B which will accommodate for a proper spinal function and posture. This is very important for the chiropractic doctor because it sets the beginning of a healthy spine. In addition, when the baby crawls, his body acts against the weight of gravity, developing his vestibular and proprioceptive systems. Furthermore, when crawling, the baby touches different surfaces and textures and this will develop the sensibility of his palms and fingers, allowing him in the future to grasp and hold small objects such as a pencil or crayon to draw, write, or play a musical instrument. These two systems will be of utmost importance in his future neurological and cognitive development.

A newborn infant has a crawling instinct right from birth, but babies will usually be ready to crawl between 8 and 10 months. There are different styles of crawling but most of them allow for simultaneously bearing weight on both arms and legs and alternating the movement of opposing extremities. All babies have their own rhythm and time. There is no use to compare the development of infants of the same age, but it is clear that babies without this experience almost always will have some degree of delay in the performance of skills explained before.

Crawling is key in developing crucial brain activities and skills that will allow the baby to succeed and to relate to his world in a more complete and satisfying manner. We should stimulate this activity by giving the baby “floor time” every day: placing him belly down to strengthen his neck, arm, and back muscles and placing colorful objects in front of him to encourage forward movements. And always remember to cheer him and to transmit love and confidence.

FWF Modified excerpt from: Baby Crawling: How Important It Really Is by Bernardo R. Sañudo Diez, DC. Read more in Pathways at pathwaystofamilywellness.org

Riding the Brakes

Riding the Brakes

girl_eating_watermelon.jpg
Regular Exercise and Regular Chiropractic Care
Whether you run or walk, play tennis or play basketball, lift weights or work-out with medicine balls, regular chiropractic care is an essential component of your exercise method of choice. We exercise because we want to, because we want to be healthy and well for all the years of our lives. Importantly, regular chiropractic care helps us achieve these health and wellness goals.

Regular exercise makes demands on many of our physiological systems, especially on the musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory, and endocrine systems. In order for these systems to respond properly, your nerve system must be operating at peak efficiency. By detecting and correcting areas of spinal nerve interference, your chiropractor helps your nerve system — your body's master system — coordinate the activities of all your body's other systems. As a result, regular chiropractic care helps you get the most out of your exercise time and helps you obtain high levels of health and well being.
We're all familiar with the highway driving experience of being behind a person who is continually braking for no apparent reason. This is especially problematic if you're in the left-hand lane. You're zipping along at the posted speed limit and suddenly the brake lights of the car in front go on. You have to immediately react and hit your brakes. If this happens more than a couple of times, you look for the first opportunity to pass this unskilled driver. The person riding their brakes may thoughtlessly cause a serious traffic problem or worse. Metaphorically, you may be physiologically "riding the brakes" without knowing it, creating ongoing problems for your long-term wellness and well-being.
For example, many of us are not aware that lack of regular vigorous exercise results in a slowing down of our metabolism. Without such exercise, our daily metabolic processes simply do not operate at peak levels. In the absence of critical energy demands imposed by regular vigorous exercise, a low level steady state takes over. Fat cells accumulate, reflexes dull, and our overall sense of awareness deteriorates. But your body is a finely crafted machine and it is designed to fulfill very high performance metrics. The aphorism, "what you don't use, you lose" applies specifically to human physiological performance. Without regular vigorous exercise, you're riding your physiological brakes and your body systems will degrade accordingly.

The good news is that these entropic effects can be reversed. Our bodies are dynamic and remarkably adaptive. Beginning or renewing an exercise program will quickly result in noticeable benefits. Many people will begin observe such benefits within four to six weeks. The important health benefits derived from regular vigorous exercise include slowing of the heart rate, increased capacity of the heart to pump blood, increased capacity of the lungs to take in oxygen, accumulation of lean muscle mass, increased creative abilities, increased ability to focus and perform useful work, and improved restful sleep.

These benefits all derive from any basic exercise program that includes some form of strength training and some form of cardiovascular exercise. Thirty minutes per day, five days a week, is the recommended standard. A program that incorporates three days of cardiovascular exercise and two days of strength training, or three days of strength training and two days of cardiovascular exercise, will be sufficient to derive maximum results. Cardiovascular exercise includes walking, running, swimming, bicycling, cross-country skiing, and sports such as basketball and lacrosse. Strength training should comprise routines including exercises for the chest, back, shoulders, arms, and legs. Certain forms of exercise such as yoga simultaneously incorporate strength training and cardiovascular exercise.

Most important is the consistency of exercise. What works for one person may not work for another. Find the types of exercise that you like to do and want to do and keep going. There will be times when you need to take a break for a week or two. Trust your instincts and return to your exercise program as appropriate. Encourage your family members to participate so that everyone can achieve peak performance, health, and wellness.

The Platonic Ideal

The Platonic Ideal

fruit
Regular Chiropractic Care and Ongoing Wellness
Regular chiropractic care is an important component of any health, fitness, and wellness program. Whether you're engaged in upgrading your diet, beginning or enhancing a program of regular, vigorous exercise, or launching a meditation or awareness practice, regular chiropractic care helps provide the physiologic framework by which you can achieve the greatest benefit from your wellness activities.
In order to derive optimum benefit from your diet, fitness, and wellness programs, your nerve system must be functioning at peak capacity. Your nerve system is your body's master system. Accurate and timely flow of information is required between your nerve system and other systems, such as your digestive, hormonal, and cardiorespiratory systems. Interruptions in the flow of these signals or miscommunications will prevent you from obtaining maximum value from your healthy diet and exercise activities. By detecting and correcting spinal misalignments that cause nerve irritation, regular chiropractic care helps ensure that all your body systems are working together in harmony. As a result, regular chiropractic care helps you and your family achieve long-term health and well-being.
Plato's Ideas were perfect templates, of which everything we perceive are tangible representations. But the Ideas were not to be found in the world around us. Rather, they were conceptions of rational thought, transcendental objects of knowledge existing in a realm beyond our own. And yet, Plato's Ideas continue to be a source of inspiration and wonder, more than 2400 years after he first described them. These ethereal notions continue to function as critical guideposts, significant markers along our various life journeys, standing for ideal outcomes we are striving for and hope to achieve.
For example, we all have our own ideal image of what physical fitness is supposed to look like. These ideal images may vary from person to person, but each image ultimately derives from a Platonic Idea of physical human beauty, strength, and musculoskeletal proportion. Our conundrum, if we care about health, wellness, and fitness, is how we're going to go about achieving our ideal. As we proceed along our path to optimal physical fitness, it's very important to keep in mind that the Idea, as such, is not an actual part of our world. We will fail if we seek to achieve such perfection. A reasonable goal is to do what needs to be done and continue to do our best in all such endeavors.
A primary major access to physical fitness is starting and maintaining a healthy, nutritious diet. Such a diet involves making consistent choices from all of the five food groups, that is, fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy products. Each of us has our own specific preferences, and some of us may have specific requirements, such as being gluten-free or lactose-free, but the requirement for variety and obtaining the nutrition provided by each group remains the same for everyone. Importantly, international health agencies strongly recommend eating five portions of fresh fruits and vegetables every day. In the United States, this recommendation has been termed, "Five to Stay Alive".
A healthy diet, maintained over months and years, provides across-the-board benefits for fitness and wellness. When combined with a program of regular vigorous exercise, healthy eating results in conversion of unneeded fat to lean muscle mass, weight loss, and an enhanced sense of well-being. Research consistently demonstrates that a healthy diet reduces the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.1 A healthy diet reduces the risk of cancer, diabetes, and obesity.2Thus, a healthy diet not only helps us achieve our own representation of the Platonic Idea of physical fitness. A healthy diet helps us achieve our own demonstration of other important Platonic Ideas, those of happiness and harmony.3
1Koutsos A, et al: Apples and cardiovascular health--is the gut microbiota a core consideration? Nutrients 7(6):3959-3998, 2015
2Esposito K, et al: A journey into a Mediterranean diet and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analyses. BMJ Open 2015 Aug 10;5(8):e008222. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008222
3Richard A, et al: Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and psychological distress: results from a population-based study. BMC Psychiatry 2015 Oct 1;15(1):213. doi: 10.1186/s12888-015-0597-4

California Breakfast

California Breakfast

girl_eating_watermelon.jpg
Regular Chiropractic Care and Healthy Eating
Eating good, nutritious food is a primary component of long-term health and wellness. Healthy eating supports the growth and development of sound, strong bodies and is a key factor in cognitive functions such as creativity and effective decision making. In addition, a nutritious diet helps us obtain restful sleep and restore our capabilities in preparation for the new day.

Although most of us hardly ever think about what's happening physiologically when we eat — what's under the hood, so to speak — we must digest our food properly and metabolize the nutrients efficiently in order to derive maximum benefit from our diet. But nerve interference can disrupt these critical processes. By correcting spinal misalignments and removing sources of nerve interference, regular chiropractic care helps ensure that our gastrointestinal, endocrine, and circulatory systems are functioning appropriately. Regular chiropractic care helps support optimal digestion and metabolism, thus enabling us to get the most out of the good foods we eat.
The mystery writer Raymond Chandler, author of "The Big Sleep" and "The Long Goodbye", famously extolled a "California breakfast" of orange juice and a cigarette. Of course, this was back in the bad old days when lighting up was part of most people's morning ritual. Today, although the orange juice might remain, a healthy breakfast consists of various nutritious replacements for the non-nourishing cigarette.

The importance of eating a good breakfast has been widely promoted in countless public health campaigns, yet many people persist in rushing past this critical meal, jumping right in to their daily work activities while bolting down an oat bran muffin or, worse, a toaster pastry. Such behavior does not support a healthy lifestyle and is especially deleterious for children and teenagers.

From the adult perspective, a lack of sufficient nutritional energy resources will negatively impact a person's work performance. In the absence of appropriate blood glucose levels, your body will seek out other energy sources such as stored fat. The metabolic demands of utilizing fat for energy are much greater than those of processes that use glucose. Over the course of a morning, such inefficient metabolism leads to tiredness, fatigue, and even a headache. Other body systems suffer, especially the digestive system and the nerve system.1,2 For example, the primary source of energy for your brain is glucose. If you've had a less-than-nutritious breakfast, the supply of glucose reaching your brain is substantially reduced. As a result, your thinking gets muddled. Creativity and decision-making processes degrade. Your overall effectiveness as a human being becomes markedly reduced.3 The negative consequences can only be imagined.

It may be fairly considered that young people depend even more on their brains than do adults. Their brains are responsible, in addition to everything else, for coordinating the growth and development of their entire bodies. The nerve system is the body's master system and the brain is the command and control center of the nerve system. Proper nutrition, critical for long-term health and well-being of all persons, is even more important for children and teenagers. Habitual lack of a healthy, nutritious breakfast leads to an unending list of problems for young people as they get older and become adults.

It is a truism that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Every meal is necessary and valuable, but a complete breakfast sets the tone for how things will go for the next 12 to 18 hours. Taking the time for breakfast is well worth the effort. When your energy stores have been replenished, you're ready for action. You might need to get out of bed 15 minutes earlier, but this change in routine will soon become a useful new habit. All of your family members will benefit by taking this time to take care of themselves.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

My Journey Leaving the Anti Vaccination Movement by Megan Heimer J.D.

My Journey Leaving the Anti Vaccination Movement

334642153_955f53fdec_zI bet you freaked out just a little bit when you read the title right? Megan? Leaving the anti-vaccination movement? Sorry to disappoint you. Someone would have to prove to me that God does not exist, I would have to switch religions, and someone would have to conduct a study showing vaccines are safe, effective, and do not have adverse reactions. To be perfectly honest though, I really don’t like these labels. I don’t vaccinate, but I respect your right to do otherwise. Is there a pro-parental rights movement? If so, sign me up for that one.
Needless to say there’s a new blogger on the scene who’s written a fairly popular postabout why she left the anti-vaccination movement. Surprisingly, I found her tone of voice refreshing. She seems nice and she’s super cute too. She’s wearing a red dress on her home page and it made me want to go out and get a hot picture of myself in a red dress too. Alas’ I am a mom and the last time I wore a red dress was a Christmas nightgown I got from my Grandma when I was seven. She’s dead and so is that nightgown.
Regardless, I’d really like to be her friend (I wonder if she has friends who don’t vaccinate). However, I think all friendships should start off on the right foot, which is why I feel like we need to talk about this post.
As a mother, I haven’t given vaccinations to thousands of children, let alone my own. My mom is a nurse. My sister is an educator who is rocking the “stay at home mama movement” like me. My other sister is a chiropractor with a degree in biology. My husband is a physician with a degree in biology and a minor in chemistry. I just have a law degree. Nothing special. Just a little something I picked up to help me read, write, research, and think critically. Although my mom vaccinated us on what was a much smaller schedule when I was younger, she regrets that decision and refuses to give vaccinations now. 

To be perfectly honest, no one in our family vaccinates. We can’t…now that we know what we know.
I have no idea what pediatric nurse practitioners learn in school. What I do know is that physicians (although highly educated) learn next to nothing about vaccines. They are told to give them and shown a picture of a child in an iron lung or a kid with measles in a third-world country. They take immunology of course, but that is not the same as vaccinology. Despite their training, doctors (and scientists) know very little about the immune system which is why there is no medical cure for any chronic autoimmune disease. This should comfort us all. 
Pediatricians of course, learn how to give vaccinations. They have to order these expensive vaccines with expiration dates and if you don’t vaccinate, they’re out money…lots and lots of money. They’re also out state excise taxes and insurance reimbursements. They are not trained to acknowledge or recognize vaccine injuries nor could they give you any drug to cure your child should they experience an adverse reaction. They didn’t learn any of this in their immunology class nor did they learn how any of the ingredients vaccines contain affect the immune system. To your surprise, they didn’t pour through the clinical trials or post-licensure studies. Very few have even read the package inserts because vaccines are presumed safe right?
Nurses are excellent at giving vaccinations. Seriously, they have a great technique (minus that one nurse who accidentally permanently injured my mom’s shoulder with a flu shot jab). They know how to store, prepare, and administer them. Most of the time this is done correctly, but I have never met a nurse who has had more training on vaccinations than a physician. Have you?
In Kid Nurse’s post she basically states that she took a pro-vaccine stance because there was no evidence to support that vaccines cause autism or shattered immune systems, because the small pox vaccine eradicated small pox, because a measles outbreak occurred in her area, she has a great uncle who is in a wheelchair because of polio, and she watched a 1-month old baby fight for its life from pertussis.
All of these are perfectly valid emotional reasons to vaccinate. However, I think if you’re going to get on your camel and make a journey to the “other side, “of the desert, you should probably do so on accurate assumption. And, since I miss taking tests, let’s do this true/false style: 

Small pox was eradicated by the vaccine. False.

Small pox had greatly declined before the vaccine, increased after the vaccine in westernized countries, and was effectively eradicated in third-world countries due to the surveillance and containment quarantine program. The small pox vaccine was actually flawed, deadly, and ineffective, killing many and inflicting even more with serious adverse reactions. Small pox eventually exterminated itself when people had access to clean water, good food, clean living conditions, and proper hygiene. (For a very well-referenced book on the history of small pox, read this. Check out the package insert for the small pox vaccine here.) 

Immunizations and vaccinations are interchangeable terms. False.

Guys, we have got to stop throwing around the terms “immunization” and vaccination as if they’re synonymous. Immunization is the process by which a person becomes immune to a disease. Vaccination does not guarantee immunity and any immunity given is temporary. 

There is supposedly no “causal” connection between vaccines and autism. True.

There’s just a whole bunch of studies where children who were vaccinated got autism; a vaccine package insert that listed autism as a potential adverse reaction; court cases won by children who developed autism post-vaccination; studies that link seizures, brain encephalopathy, and gut disorders to vaccines and studies that link seizures, gut disorders, and brain encephalopathy to autism; a vaccine removed from the market because it caused brain damage in children (i.e. autism & DPT), studies on theingredients in vaccines that cause autism, and a whole bunch of empirical data that is super important unless…it pertains to autism.

The best way to protect a baby from pertussis is to vaccinate. False. 

Many people decide to vaccinate after they see a child injured from pertussis. Many people decide not to vaccinate because they have seen a child injured from the pertussis vaccine. These are both emotional arguments. The truth of the matter is that babies would be protected from many diseases if mothers acquired lifetime immunity via natural exposure and subsequently passed protective antibodies to their babies. Vaccines destroy this passive immunity and put our infants at risk. However, since neither the vaccine nor pertussis give lifetime immunity we now give ineffective, untested, dangerous, “Category C” Tdap vaccines to pregnant women.
That aside, as reported in 2012 by every major news outlet and confirmed by the CDC, the Dtap vaccine is ineffective and wanes over time which is why we see pertussis outbreaks occurring in almost exclusively vaccinated populations, why those vaccinated are becoming asymptomatic carriers for the disease, and why “the numberof reported pertussis cases have been steadily increasing since the 1980s.” Other news sources have reported that the pertussis bacteria is becoming resistant to the vaccine and that B. parapertussis might actually be to blame for some of the outbreaks. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, even after five doses of Dtap a person’s chance of acquiring pertussis increases by 42% each year.
So, a vaccine gives us temporary (if any) immunity, with junk ingredients, and a chance of adverse reactions like eczema, bronchitis, respiratory infections, encephalopathy, cough (which I find ironic), and SIDS. No thanks. There are better way to protect ourselves and our children from pertussis. 

Polio is scary. False…

Unless you actually had polio. Believe it or not, polio is asymptomatic in 95% of people who actually get it; and prior to polio vaccine licensure, anything with paralysis lasting longer than 24 hours would have yielded a polio diagnosis. Aseptic and viral meningitis, Coxsackie virus, hand foot mouth, transverse myelitis, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Syphilis, DDT, arsenic, and lead poisoning etc. were all diagnosed as polio prior to the vaccine. Seriously, you could play dead and get a polio diagnosis.
After vaccine licensure, diagnostic criteria changed to make the vaccine look more effective. The 220, 365 cases of non-paralytic polio that occurred between 1960 and 1992 were now labeled “aseptic meningitis.” This is just one of many examples. Not to mention that the only cases of polio recorded between 1973 and 2000 were caused by the vaccine.  So we should all ask ourselves, did our dear friend, neighbor, or relative with polio actually have polio? If they did have polio, was it caused by the vaccine? Are they in a wheel-chair? If so, was it due to the barbaric methods used by the medical profession to treat polio? While we’re at it, does our dear friend, neighbor, or relative have cancer? If so, was it caused by the polio vaccine? 

True/false aside, here are some really good reasons to leave the “anti-vaccination movement:”

Double-blind, inert/saline placebo-controlled clinical trials show vaccines are safe. None have been done to date. 
Studies show that vaccinated children are healthier than unvaccinated children. No large-scale study in the United States has been done to date. 
Studies show vaccines do not have adverse reactions. Currently, all vaccines have possible adverse reactions. 

Studies show vaccines do not cause any health conditions, including the ones they’re designed to prevent. All vaccines can and have caused the very diseases they’re designed to prevent.

Studies show that herd immunity applies to vaccinations. It has been presumed that herd immunity applies to vaccines. 

Studies show vaccines actually prevent disease. Currently, not a single study to date has proven this. This hypothesis is dependent upon the assumption that every single person would have gotten the disease if they weren’t vaccinated and that vaccinations are the only way to prevent disease.
Vaccines gives lifetime immunity. Currently, not a single vaccine offers lifetime immunity.
And my favorite…science proves vaccines do a better job at preventing disease than my God-given immune system. If you don’t believe in God, “studies show biology missed something when it gave every man and animal on the planet an immune system.”
Clearly, I’m not taking a journey any time soon. Vaccines or not, I hope we can be friends. I’ve found this red dress I’m just dying to try on.

Monday, January 18, 2016

25 Studies from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health that link Autism to Vaccine

25 Studies from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health that link Autism to Vaccines-
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3878266/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21623535
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25377033
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24995277
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12145534
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21058170
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22099159
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3364648/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17454560
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19106436
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3774468/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3697751/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21299355
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21907498
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11339848
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17674242
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993250
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15780490
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12933322
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16870260
http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-1-4614-4788-7_89
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19043938
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12142947
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24675092
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25198681

A two-phase study evaluating the relationship between Thimerosal-containing vaccine...
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is defined by standardized criteria of qualitative impairments in social interaction, qualitative impairments in communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities. A significant number of children diagnosed with ASD suffer a…
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Going for the Gold

Going for the Gold

exercise for health
Regular Chiropractic Care and Long-Term Health
Having your musculoskeletal system in top working order is a prime requirement for maximizing the benefit of the time you spend exercising. When your muscles, ligaments, tendons, and joints are functioning properly, without undergoing any inappropriate stress and strain, then you're able to exercise at your peak, engage in full effort, improve your strength and endurance, and have fun in the process.
Regular chiropractic care helps make these outcomes possible by detecting and correcting spinal misalignments and nerve interference. By removing these roadblocks to biomechanical performance, regular chiropractic care helps ensure that you get the most benefit out of all your daily activities, including exercise.
Whether your preferred method of exercise is walking, running, swimming, biking, yoga, strength training, or any combination of these activities, regular chiropractic care helps you achieve your fitness and long-term health goals.
It seems that at least once a month, some sort of senior fitness competition is featured on the sports page of local and national newspapers. The Senior Olympics was the forerunner of these types of events, and the designation quickly morphed into the National Senior Games. Soon localities and municipalities began hosting their own senior track, swimming, and ironman competitions. Sociologists would call this a trend.
However, just as younger national-class competitive athletes and professional sports stars are not representative of the population at large, none of these senior athletes is representative of seniors as a group. The important takeaway from the surge of senior athletic events is that anyone at any age can become physically fit and maintain high levels of health and fitness. It's not necessary to achieve an extraordinary level of competitive fitness. What is necessary is to be a person who is fit, healthy, and well.1,2
With very few exceptions, any person, regardless of her or his current status, can become physically fit. The steps to take have been well described over many decades. Broadcast, print, and online media are saturated with articles and programs dedicated to teaching people how to lose weight and start exercise programs. In reality, everyone knows what he or she needs to do. One big step is portion control. Most adults consume far too many calories per day, much more than they need to maintain daily metabolic requirements. In contrast, for most adults, a daily diet containing 1800 healthy calories per day would result in substantial weight loss. The next big step is to begin and maintain a long-term exercise program, consisting of at least 30 minutes of exercise five days a week. A healthy diet and regular exercise, maintained over time, will result in ongoing high levels of physical fitness and wellness.3
But, if everyone knows what steps to take to accomplish these goals, why isn't everyone physically fit? The answers, for specific individuals, may be complex, but the overall answer is lack of motivation. Merely knowing how to do something isn't enough. You have to want to do something. You have to have the desire to do it. There has to be something in it for you. Having your spouse, doctor, or even religious counselor tell you you need to lose weight and start exercising will never get you to stick with the program. In order for you to make meaningful change, you must provide the motivation yourself.
Importantly, this internal motivation needs to be ongoing. There may be times when you do some binge eating or stop exercising. But the secret is to find the means of re-motivating yourself and returning to your fitness programs. By doing so you will derive tremendous satisfaction and gain real, long-term health and wellness.
1Buford TW, et al: Optimizing the benefits of exercise on physical function in older adults. PM R 6(6):528-543, 2014
2Hills AP, et al: Physical Activity and Health: "What is Old is New Again". Adv Food Nutr Res 75:77-95, 2015
3Myers J, et al: Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness as major markers of cardiovascular risk: their independent and interwoven importance to health status. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 57(4):306-314, 2015